Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The contributions of encoding, retention, and recall to the Hebb effect


Oberauer, Klaus; Meyers, N (2009). The contributions of encoding, retention, and recall to the Hebb effect. Memory, 17(7):774-781.

Abstract

The article reports an experiment testing whether the Hebb repetition effect*the gradual improvement
of immediate serial recall when the same list is repeated several times*depends on overt recall of the
repeated lists. Previous reports which suggest that recall is critical confound the recall manipulation with
retention interval. The present experiment orthogonally varies retention interval (0 or 9 s) and whether
the list is to be recalled after the retention interval. Hebb repetition learning is assessed in a final test
phase. A repetition effect was obtained in all four experimental conditions; it was larger for recalled than
non-recalled lists, whereas retention interval had no effect. The results show that encoding is sufficient to
generate cumulative long-term learning, which is strengthened by recall. Rehearsal, if it takes place in the
retention interval at all, does not have the same effect on long-term learning as overt recall.

Abstract

The article reports an experiment testing whether the Hebb repetition effect*the gradual improvement
of immediate serial recall when the same list is repeated several times*depends on overt recall of the
repeated lists. Previous reports which suggest that recall is critical confound the recall manipulation with
retention interval. The present experiment orthogonally varies retention interval (0 or 9 s) and whether
the list is to be recalled after the retention interval. Hebb repetition learning is assessed in a final test
phase. A repetition effect was obtained in all four experimental conditions; it was larger for recalled than
non-recalled lists, whereas retention interval had no effect. The results show that encoding is sufficient to
generate cumulative long-term learning, which is strengthened by recall. Rehearsal, if it takes place in the
retention interval at all, does not have the same effect on long-term learning as overt recall.

Statistics

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 27 Jan 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Short-term memory; Long-term memory; Serial order; Recall
Language:English
Date:7 October 2009
Deposited On:27 Jan 2010 10:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:48
Publisher:Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN:0965-8211
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/09658210903107861

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF (Verlags-PDF) - Registered users only
Size: 100kB
View at publisher