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Cardiac resynchronisation therapy in paediatric and congenital heart disease: differential effects in various anatomical and functional substrates


Janousek, J; Gebauer, R A; Abdul-Khaliq, H; Turner, M; Kornyei, L; Grollmuss, O; Rosenthal, E; Villain, E; Früh, A; Paul, T; Blom, N A; Happonen, J M; Bauersfeld, U; Jacobsen, J R; van den Heuvel, F; Delhaas, T; Papagiannis, J; Trigo, C (2009). Cardiac resynchronisation therapy in paediatric and congenital heart disease: differential effects in various anatomical and functional substrates. Heart, 95(14):1165-1171.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in children in a variety of anatomical and pathophysiological conditions, but published data are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To record current practice and results of CRT in paediatric and congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Retrospective multicentre European survey. SETTING: Paediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery centres. PATIENTS: One hundred and nine patients aged 0.24-73.8 (median 16.9) years with structural congenital heart disease (n = 87), congenital atrioventricular block (n = 12) and dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 10) with systemic left (n = 69), right (n = 36) or single (n = 4) ventricular dysfunction and ventricular dyssynchrony during sinus rhythm (n = 25) or associated with pacing (n = 84). INTERVENTIONS: CRT for a median period of 7.5 months (concurrent cardiac surgery in 16/109). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Functional improvement and echocardiographic change in systemic ventricular function. RESULTS: The z score of the systemic ventricular end-diastolic dimension decreased by median 1.1 (p<0.001). Ejection fraction (EF) or fractional area of change increased by a mean (SD) of 11.5 (14.3)% (p<0.001) and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class improved by median 1.0 grade (p<0.001). Non-response to CRT (18.5%) was multivariably predicted by the presence of primary dilated cardiomyopathy (p = 0.002) and poor NYHA class (p = 0.003). Presence of a systemic left ventricle was the strongest multivariable predictor of improvement in EF/fractional area of change (p<0.001). Results were independent of the number of patients treated in each contributing centre. CONCLUSION: Heart failure associated with ventricular pacing is the largest indication for CRT in paediatric and congenital heart disease. CRT efficacy varies widely with the underlying anatomical and pathophysiological substrate.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in children in a variety of anatomical and pathophysiological conditions, but published data are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To record current practice and results of CRT in paediatric and congenital heart disease. DESIGN: Retrospective multicentre European survey. SETTING: Paediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery centres. PATIENTS: One hundred and nine patients aged 0.24-73.8 (median 16.9) years with structural congenital heart disease (n = 87), congenital atrioventricular block (n = 12) and dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 10) with systemic left (n = 69), right (n = 36) or single (n = 4) ventricular dysfunction and ventricular dyssynchrony during sinus rhythm (n = 25) or associated with pacing (n = 84). INTERVENTIONS: CRT for a median period of 7.5 months (concurrent cardiac surgery in 16/109). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Functional improvement and echocardiographic change in systemic ventricular function. RESULTS: The z score of the systemic ventricular end-diastolic dimension decreased by median 1.1 (p<0.001). Ejection fraction (EF) or fractional area of change increased by a mean (SD) of 11.5 (14.3)% (p<0.001) and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class improved by median 1.0 grade (p<0.001). Non-response to CRT (18.5%) was multivariably predicted by the presence of primary dilated cardiomyopathy (p = 0.002) and poor NYHA class (p = 0.003). Presence of a systemic left ventricle was the strongest multivariable predictor of improvement in EF/fractional area of change (p<0.001). Results were independent of the number of patients treated in each contributing centre. CONCLUSION: Heart failure associated with ventricular pacing is the largest indication for CRT in paediatric and congenital heart disease. CRT efficacy varies widely with the underlying anatomical and pathophysiological substrate.

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Additional indexing

Contributors:Working Group for Cardiac Dysrhythmias, Electrophysiology of the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:03 Feb 2010 15:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:49
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1355-6037
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2008.160465
PubMed ID:19307198

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