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School effects on students’ self-regulated learning. A multivariate analysis of the relationship between individual perceptions of school processes and cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational dimensions of self-regulated learning


Leutwyler, Bruno; Maag Merki, Katharina (2009). School effects on students’ self-regulated learning. A multivariate analysis of the relationship between individual perceptions of school processes and cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational dimensions of self-regulated learning. Journal for Educational Research Online, 1(1):197-223.

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to identify the scope of influence for enhancing students’ self-regulated learning. Whereas the existing evidence generally shows the impact of schooling on motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive dimensions of self-regulated learning separately for each dimension, the present study compares the impact of schooling on the different aspects of self-regulated learning in an ecologically valid setting without specific training programs. To this end, the study analyses the individual development patterns of 1432 students in a longitudinal sample drawn from Grade 10 to Grade 12. The results of multiple regression analyses show that school and instructional processes can explain a remarkable part of students’ development in self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the current data suggest that different configurations of social and didactical factors promote motivational, cognitive, and meta-cognitive self-regulation and that the scope of influence varies to a substantial degree within the construct “self-regulated learning.” The present study thus allows for a dif-ferentiated estimate regarding the extent to which the schools can promote the pivotal aim – that of self-regulated learning.

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to identify the scope of influence for enhancing students’ self-regulated learning. Whereas the existing evidence generally shows the impact of schooling on motivational, cognitive, and metacognitive dimensions of self-regulated learning separately for each dimension, the present study compares the impact of schooling on the different aspects of self-regulated learning in an ecologically valid setting without specific training programs. To this end, the study analyses the individual development patterns of 1432 students in a longitudinal sample drawn from Grade 10 to Grade 12. The results of multiple regression analyses show that school and instructional processes can explain a remarkable part of students’ development in self-regulated learning. Furthermore, the current data suggest that different configurations of social and didactical factors promote motivational, cognitive, and meta-cognitive self-regulation and that the scope of influence varies to a substantial degree within the construct “self-regulated learning.” The present study thus allows for a dif-ferentiated estimate regarding the extent to which the schools can promote the pivotal aim – that of self-regulated learning.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Education
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:31 Jan 2010 17:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:50
Publisher:Institut für Schulentwicklungsforschung
ISSN:1866-6671
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.j-e-r-o.com/index.php/jero/article/view/67/55

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