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Increasing fatal AA amyloidosis in hunting falcons and how to identify the risk: a report from the United Arab Emirates


Hampel, M R. Increasing fatal AA amyloidosis in hunting falcons and how to identify the risk: a report from the United Arab Emirates. 2009, University of Zurich, Vetsuisse Faculty.

Abstract

In hunting falcons, a fatal syndrome of wasting, weight loss, green mutes and, finally, sudden death of emaciated birds has been observed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Histological examination using Congo red has revealed amyloid in most organs, in particular in the liver, spleen, kidney, and adrenal glands. Moreover, a retrospective study revealed amyloidosis in 100 cases among a total of 623 necropsied falcons between August 1995 and March 2004 in Dubai/UAE (16%; varying from 8 to 30% in different raptor bird species). The amyloid was immunohistochemically classified as amyloid A (AA), which was confirmed by Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, suggesting it to be secondary to a chronic inflammatory process. Retrospective analysis has indicated a significantly increased prevalence of bumble foot and visceral gout among falcons with amyloidosis. In addition, a significant increase of amyloidosis from 5.6% of necropsied falcons with amyloidosis in 1995 to 40.0% in 2004 has been noticed.
Finally, a semi-quantitative serum test for falcon serum amyloid A (f-SAA) has been developed. Among 38 falcons with fatal AA amyloidosis, f-SAA was increased pathologically in 36, whereas f-SAA was elevated in only one of 15 apparently disease-free falcons (p < 0.001). This significant result indicates that a normal f-SAA will indicate a minimal or even absent risk of succumbing to AA amyloidosis.

Abstract

In hunting falcons, a fatal syndrome of wasting, weight loss, green mutes and, finally, sudden death of emaciated birds has been observed in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Histological examination using Congo red has revealed amyloid in most organs, in particular in the liver, spleen, kidney, and adrenal glands. Moreover, a retrospective study revealed amyloidosis in 100 cases among a total of 623 necropsied falcons between August 1995 and March 2004 in Dubai/UAE (16%; varying from 8 to 30% in different raptor bird species). The amyloid was immunohistochemically classified as amyloid A (AA), which was confirmed by Western blot analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, suggesting it to be secondary to a chronic inflammatory process. Retrospective analysis has indicated a significantly increased prevalence of bumble foot and visceral gout among falcons with amyloidosis. In addition, a significant increase of amyloidosis from 5.6% of necropsied falcons with amyloidosis in 1995 to 40.0% in 2004 has been noticed.
Finally, a semi-quantitative serum test for falcon serum amyloid A (f-SAA) has been developed. Among 38 falcons with fatal AA amyloidosis, f-SAA was increased pathologically in 36, whereas f-SAA was elevated in only one of 15 apparently disease-free falcons (p < 0.001). This significant result indicates that a normal f-SAA will indicate a minimal or even absent risk of succumbing to AA amyloidosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation
Referees:Pospischil A, Wenery U
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:03 Feb 2010 14:52
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 00:06
Number of Pages:10
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005916396

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