Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Clinical appearance and pathology of cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus of different genetic subgroups


Bachofen, C; Braun, U; Hilbe, M; Ehrensperger, F; Stalder, H; Peterhans, E (2010). Clinical appearance and pathology of cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhoea virus of different genetic subgroups. Veterinary Microbiology, 141(3-4):258-267.

Abstract

Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is an economically important cattle disease with a world-wide distribution that is caused by BVD virus, a pestivirus of the flaviviridae family. BVD viruses are genetically highly variable. They are classified into two genetic species (BVDV-1 and -2) that are further divided into numerous subgroups, particularly for BVDV-1. The complexity of these viruses is also reflected in their interaction with the host animals. Infections are either transient or persistent and can cause a wide spectrum of clinical signs, from no or very mild disease to severe forms, reminiscent of viral haemorrhagic fevers. In this work, we have analysed the clinical signs and the pathology of BVD viral infections in a cattle population where different subgroups of BVDV-1 genotype viruses are endemic. In addition, we have examined potential virulence properties of BVDV-1 subgroups during persistent infection by comparing the viral subgroups present in clinical cases with those detected in persistently infected (PI) animals sampled for epidemiological criteria, irrespective of their health condition. Furthermore, the clinical and postmortem findings were compared with respect to genetic characteristics of the viruses isolated from these animals. Our results indicate that the BVDV positive animals fall roughly into two categories, depending on the primary organ affected and the age, with lung-centred pathology occurring mainly in young animals and mucosal pathology predominantly in older animals. Furthermore, we found a markedly higher proportion of representatives of the BVDV-1e subgroup in stillborn calves and aborted foetuses originating from epidemically unrelated cattle herds, suggesting that BVDV-1e may play a special role in prenatal and perinatal losses.

Abstract

Bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) is an economically important cattle disease with a world-wide distribution that is caused by BVD virus, a pestivirus of the flaviviridae family. BVD viruses are genetically highly variable. They are classified into two genetic species (BVDV-1 and -2) that are further divided into numerous subgroups, particularly for BVDV-1. The complexity of these viruses is also reflected in their interaction with the host animals. Infections are either transient or persistent and can cause a wide spectrum of clinical signs, from no or very mild disease to severe forms, reminiscent of viral haemorrhagic fevers. In this work, we have analysed the clinical signs and the pathology of BVD viral infections in a cattle population where different subgroups of BVDV-1 genotype viruses are endemic. In addition, we have examined potential virulence properties of BVDV-1 subgroups during persistent infection by comparing the viral subgroups present in clinical cases with those detected in persistently infected (PI) animals sampled for epidemiological criteria, irrespective of their health condition. Furthermore, the clinical and postmortem findings were compared with respect to genetic characteristics of the viruses isolated from these animals. Our results indicate that the BVDV positive animals fall roughly into two categories, depending on the primary organ affected and the age, with lung-centred pathology occurring mainly in young animals and mucosal pathology predominantly in older animals. Furthermore, we found a markedly higher proportion of representatives of the BVDV-1e subgroup in stillborn calves and aborted foetuses originating from epidemically unrelated cattle herds, suggesting that BVDV-1e may play a special role in prenatal and perinatal losses.

Statistics

Citations

17 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

135 downloads since deposited on 03 Feb 2010
9 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:24 March 2010
Deposited On:03 Feb 2010 14:06
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-1135
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2009.09.022
PubMed ID:19819088

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 537kB
View at publisher
Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations