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Morphine induces defects in early response of alveolar macrophages to Streptococcus pneumoniae by modulating TLR9-NF-kappaB signaling


Wang, J; Barke, R A; Charboneau, R; Schwendener, R; Roy, S (2008). Morphine induces defects in early response of alveolar macrophages to Streptococcus pneumoniae by modulating TLR9-NF-kappaB signaling. Journal of Immunology, 180(5):3594-3600.

Abstract

Resident alveolar macrophages and respiratory epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against invading lung pneumococci. Results from our study showed that increased mortality and bacterial outgrowth and dissemination seen in morphine-treated mice were further exaggerated following depletion of alveolar macrophages with liposomal clodronate. Using an in vitro alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells infection model, we show significant release of MIP-2 from alveolar macrophages, but not from lung epithelial cells, following 4 h of exposure of cells to pneumococci infection. Morphine treatment reduced MIP-2 release in pneumococci stimulated alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, morphine treatment inhibited Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription in alveolar macrophages following 2 h of in vitro infection. S. pneumoniae infection resulted in a significant induction of NF-kappaB activity only in TLR9 stably transfected HEK 293 cells, but not in TLR2 and TLR4 transfected HEK 293 cells, and morphine treatment inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB activity in these cells. Moreover, morphine treatment also decreased bacterial uptake and killing in alveolar macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that morphine treatment impairs TLR9-NF-kappaB signaling and diminishes bacterial clearance following S. pneumoniae infection in resident macrophages during the early stages of infection, leading to a compromised innate immune response.

Abstract

Resident alveolar macrophages and respiratory epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against invading lung pneumococci. Results from our study showed that increased mortality and bacterial outgrowth and dissemination seen in morphine-treated mice were further exaggerated following depletion of alveolar macrophages with liposomal clodronate. Using an in vitro alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells infection model, we show significant release of MIP-2 from alveolar macrophages, but not from lung epithelial cells, following 4 h of exposure of cells to pneumococci infection. Morphine treatment reduced MIP-2 release in pneumococci stimulated alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, morphine treatment inhibited Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB-dependent gene transcription in alveolar macrophages following 2 h of in vitro infection. S. pneumoniae infection resulted in a significant induction of NF-kappaB activity only in TLR9 stably transfected HEK 293 cells, but not in TLR2 and TLR4 transfected HEK 293 cells, and morphine treatment inhibited S. pneumoniae-induced NF-kappaB activity in these cells. Moreover, morphine treatment also decreased bacterial uptake and killing in alveolar macrophages. Taken together, these results suggest that morphine treatment impairs TLR9-NF-kappaB signaling and diminishes bacterial clearance following S. pneumoniae infection in resident macrophages during the early stages of infection, leading to a compromised innate immune response.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:26 Aug 2008 15:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:25
Publisher:American Association of Immunologists
ISSN:0022-1767
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.180.5.3594
Official URL:http://www.jimmunol.org/cgi/reprint/180/5/3594
PubMed ID:18292587

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