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Long-lasting immunity by early infection of maternal-antibody-protected infants


Navarini, A A; Krzyzowska, M; Lang, K S; Horvath, E; Hengartner, H; Niemialtowski, M G; Zinkernagel, R M (2010). Long-lasting immunity by early infection of maternal-antibody-protected infants. European Journal of Immunology, 40(1):113-116.

Abstract

Newborn higher vertebrates are largely immuno-incompetent and generally survive infections--including poxviruses--by maternal antibody protection. Here, we show that mice survived epidemics as adults only if exposed to lethal orthopoxvirus infections during infancy under the umbrella of maternal protective antibodies. This implies that both the absence of exposure to infection during early infancy or of effective vaccination renders the population highly susceptible to new or old re-emerging pathogens.

Abstract

Newborn higher vertebrates are largely immuno-incompetent and generally survive infections--including poxviruses--by maternal antibody protection. Here, we show that mice survived epidemics as adults only if exposed to lethal orthopoxvirus infections during infancy under the umbrella of maternal protective antibodies. This implies that both the absence of exposure to infection during early infancy or of effective vaccination renders the population highly susceptible to new or old re-emerging pathogens.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:09 Feb 2010 09:31
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 16:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0014-2980
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/eji.200939371
PubMed ID:19877011

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