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Two-stage dynamic DNA quality check by xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein


Camenisch, U; Träutlein, D; Clement, F C; Fei, J; Leitenstorfer, A; Ferrando-May, E; Naegeli, H (2009). Two-stage dynamic DNA quality check by xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein. EMBO Journal, 28(16):2387-2399.

Abstract

Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein initiates the DNA excision repair of helix-distorting base lesions. To understand how this versatile subunit searches for aberrant sites within the vast background of normal genomic DNA, the real-time redistribution of fluorescent fusion constructs was monitored after high-resolution DNA damage induction. Bidirectional truncation analyses disclosed a surprisingly short recognition hotspot, comprising approximately 15% of human XPC, that includes two beta-hairpin domains with a preference for non-hydrogen-bonded bases in double-stranded DNA. However, to detect damaged sites in living cells, these DNA-attractive domains depend on the partially DNA-repulsive action of an adjacent beta-turn extension that promotes the mobility of XPC molecules searching for lesions. The key function of this dynamic interaction surface is shown by a site-directed charge inversion, which results in increased affinity for native DNA, retarded nuclear mobility and diminished repair efficiency. These studies reveal a two-stage discrimination process, whereby XPC protein first deploys a dynamic sensor interface to rapidly interrogate the double helix, thus forming a transient recognition intermediate before the final installation of a more static repair-initiating complex.

Abstract

Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein initiates the DNA excision repair of helix-distorting base lesions. To understand how this versatile subunit searches for aberrant sites within the vast background of normal genomic DNA, the real-time redistribution of fluorescent fusion constructs was monitored after high-resolution DNA damage induction. Bidirectional truncation analyses disclosed a surprisingly short recognition hotspot, comprising approximately 15% of human XPC, that includes two beta-hairpin domains with a preference for non-hydrogen-bonded bases in double-stranded DNA. However, to detect damaged sites in living cells, these DNA-attractive domains depend on the partially DNA-repulsive action of an adjacent beta-turn extension that promotes the mobility of XPC molecules searching for lesions. The key function of this dynamic interaction surface is shown by a site-directed charge inversion, which results in increased affinity for native DNA, retarded nuclear mobility and diminished repair efficiency. These studies reveal a two-stage discrimination process, whereby XPC protein first deploys a dynamic sensor interface to rapidly interrogate the double helix, thus forming a transient recognition intermediate before the final installation of a more static repair-initiating complex.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Feb 2010 15:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0261-4189
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2009.187
PubMed ID:19609301

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