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Distinct organ-specific up- and down-regulation of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA in various organs of a GH-overexpressing transgenic Nile tilapia


Eppler, E; Berishvili, G; Mazel, P; Caelers, A; Hwang, G; Maclean, N; Reinecke, M (2010). Distinct organ-specific up- and down-regulation of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA in various organs of a GH-overexpressing transgenic Nile tilapia. Transgenic Research, 19(2):231-240.

Abstract

Several lines of GH-overexpressing fish have been produced and characterized concerning organ integrity, growth, fertility and health but few and contradictory data are available on IGF-I that mediates most effects of GH. Furthermore, nothing is known on IGF-II. Thus, the expression of both IGFs in liver and various extrahepatic sites of adult transgenic (GH-overexpressing) tilapia and age-matched wild-type fish was determined by real-time PCR. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were found in all organs investigated and were increased in gills, kidney, intestine, heart, testes, skeletal muscle and brain of the transgenics (IGF-I: 1.4-4-fold; IGF-II: 1.7-4.2-fold). Except for liver, brain and testis the increase in IGF-I mRNA was higher than that in IGF-II mRNA. In pituitary, no significant change in IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA was detected. In spleen, however, IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were both decreased in the transgenics, IGF-I mRNA even by the 19-fold. In agreement, in situ hybridisation revealed a largely reduced number of IGF-I mRNA-containing leukocytes and macrophages when compared to wild-type. These observations may contribute to better understanding the reported impaired health of GH-transgenic fish. Growth enhancement of the transgenics may be due to the increased expression of both IGF-I and IGF-II in extrahepatic sites. It is also reasonable that the markedly enhanced expression of liver IGF-II mRNA that may mimick an early developmental stage is a further reason for increased growth.

Abstract

Several lines of GH-overexpressing fish have been produced and characterized concerning organ integrity, growth, fertility and health but few and contradictory data are available on IGF-I that mediates most effects of GH. Furthermore, nothing is known on IGF-II. Thus, the expression of both IGFs in liver and various extrahepatic sites of adult transgenic (GH-overexpressing) tilapia and age-matched wild-type fish was determined by real-time PCR. Both IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were found in all organs investigated and were increased in gills, kidney, intestine, heart, testes, skeletal muscle and brain of the transgenics (IGF-I: 1.4-4-fold; IGF-II: 1.7-4.2-fold). Except for liver, brain and testis the increase in IGF-I mRNA was higher than that in IGF-II mRNA. In pituitary, no significant change in IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA was detected. In spleen, however, IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were both decreased in the transgenics, IGF-I mRNA even by the 19-fold. In agreement, in situ hybridisation revealed a largely reduced number of IGF-I mRNA-containing leukocytes and macrophages when compared to wild-type. These observations may contribute to better understanding the reported impaired health of GH-transgenic fish. Growth enhancement of the transgenics may be due to the increased expression of both IGF-I and IGF-II in extrahepatic sites. It is also reasonable that the markedly enhanced expression of liver IGF-II mRNA that may mimick an early developmental stage is a further reason for increased growth.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:11 August 2010
Deposited On:04 Mar 2010 13:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0962-8819
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11248-009-9314-8
PubMed ID:19669925

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