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Further insights into the insulin-like growth factor-I system of bony fish pituitary with special emphasis on reproductive phases and social status


Shved, N; Baroiller, J F; Eppler, E (2009). Further insights into the insulin-like growth factor-I system of bony fish pituitary with special emphasis on reproductive phases and social status. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1163:517-520.

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, which is crucially involved in fish growth, differentiation, and reproduction, occurs in tilapia pituitary. IGF-I peptide, which is probably produced in hypothalamic perikarya, is present in axons of the neurohypophysis, and IGF-I mRNA and peptide are present in the adenohypophysis in adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells, melanocyte-stimulating hormone cells, with interindividual differences in growth hormone cells, and, starting with puberty, in gonadotrophic hormone (GTH) cells. Subordinate males showed a high IGF-I but a lower beta-luteinizing hormone expression, while in dominant males the opposite was found. IGF-I from the GTH cells may act as auto/paracrine regulators of GTH cell proliferation and enhance GTH synthesis and release during puberty and reproduction, depending on the social status.

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, which is crucially involved in fish growth, differentiation, and reproduction, occurs in tilapia pituitary. IGF-I peptide, which is probably produced in hypothalamic perikarya, is present in axons of the neurohypophysis, and IGF-I mRNA and peptide are present in the adenohypophysis in adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells, melanocyte-stimulating hormone cells, with interindividual differences in growth hormone cells, and, starting with puberty, in gonadotrophic hormone (GTH) cells. Subordinate males showed a high IGF-I but a lower beta-luteinizing hormone expression, while in dominant males the opposite was found. IGF-I from the GTH cells may act as auto/paracrine regulators of GTH cell proliferation and enhance GTH synthesis and release during puberty and reproduction, depending on the social status.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:27 April 2009
Deposited On:28 Feb 2010 14:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:53
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0077-8923
Additional Information:© 2010 The New York Academy of Sciences
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.2008.03632.x
PubMed ID:19456403

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