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How not to get scar(r)ed: pointers to the correct diagnosis in patients with suspected primary cicatricial alopecia


Harries, M J; Trueb, R M; Tosti, A; Messenger, A G; Chaudhry, I; Whiting, D A; Sinclair, R; Griffiths, C E M; Paus, R (2009). How not to get scar(r)ed: pointers to the correct diagnosis in patients with suspected primary cicatricial alopecia. British Journal of Dermatology, 160(3):482-501.

Abstract

Primary cicatricial alopecias (PCAs) are a rare, but important, group of disorders that cause irreversible damage to hair follicles resulting in scarring and permanent hair loss. They may also signify an underlying systemic disease. Thus, it is of paramount importance that clinicians who manage patients with hair loss are able to diagnose these disorders accurately. Unfortunately, PCAs are notoriously difficult conditions to diagnose and treat. The aim of this review is to present a rational and pragmatic guide to help clinicians in the professional assessment, investigation and diagnosis of patients with PCA. Illustrating typical clinical and histopathological presentations of key PCA entities we show how dermatoscopy can be profitably used for clinical diagnosis. Further, we advocate the search for loss of follicular ostia as a clinical hallmark of PCA, and suggest pragmatic strategies that allow rapid formulation of a working diagnosis.

Abstract

Primary cicatricial alopecias (PCAs) are a rare, but important, group of disorders that cause irreversible damage to hair follicles resulting in scarring and permanent hair loss. They may also signify an underlying systemic disease. Thus, it is of paramount importance that clinicians who manage patients with hair loss are able to diagnose these disorders accurately. Unfortunately, PCAs are notoriously difficult conditions to diagnose and treat. The aim of this review is to present a rational and pragmatic guide to help clinicians in the professional assessment, investigation and diagnosis of patients with PCA. Illustrating typical clinical and histopathological presentations of key PCA entities we show how dermatoscopy can be profitably used for clinical diagnosis. Further, we advocate the search for loss of follicular ostia as a clinical hallmark of PCA, and suggest pragmatic strategies that allow rapid formulation of a working diagnosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Mar 2010 09:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0007-0963
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2008.09008.x
PubMed ID:19183169

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