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Patient-specific three-dimensional composite bone models for teaching and operation planning


Matthews, F; Messmer, P; Raikov, V; Wanner, G A; Jacob, A L; Regazzoni, P; Egli, A (2009). Patient-specific three-dimensional composite bone models for teaching and operation planning. Journal of Digital Imaging, 22(5):473-482.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Orthopedic trauma care relies on two-dimensional radiograms both before and during the operation. Understanding the three-dimensional nature of complex fractures on plain radiograms is challenging. Modern fluoroscopes can acquire three-dimensional volume datasets even during an operation, but the device limitations constrain the acquired volume to a cube of only 12-cm edge. However, viewing the surrounding intact structures is important to comprehend the fracture in its context. We suggest merging a fluoroscope's volume scan into a generic bone model to form a composite full-length 3D bone model. METHODS: Materials consisted of one cadaver bone and 20 three-dimensional surface models of human femora. Radiograms and computed tomography scans were taken before and after applying a controlled fracture to the bone. A 3D scan of the fracture was acquired using a mobile fluoroscope (Siemens Siremobil). The fracture was fitted into the generic bone models by rigid registration using a modified least-squares algorithm. Registration precision was determined and a clinical appraisal of the composite models obtained. RESULTS: Twenty composite bone models were generated. Average registration precision was 2.0 mm (range 1.6 to 2.6). Average processing time on a laptop computer was 35 s (range 20 to 55). Comparing synthesized radiograms with the actual radiograms of the fractured bone yielded clinically satisfactory results. CONCLUSION: A three-dimensional full-length representation of a fractured bone can reliably be synthesized from a short scan of the patient's fracture and a generic bone model. This patient-specific model can subsequently be used for teaching, surgical operation planning, and intraoperative visualization purposes.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Orthopedic trauma care relies on two-dimensional radiograms both before and during the operation. Understanding the three-dimensional nature of complex fractures on plain radiograms is challenging. Modern fluoroscopes can acquire three-dimensional volume datasets even during an operation, but the device limitations constrain the acquired volume to a cube of only 12-cm edge. However, viewing the surrounding intact structures is important to comprehend the fracture in its context. We suggest merging a fluoroscope's volume scan into a generic bone model to form a composite full-length 3D bone model. METHODS: Materials consisted of one cadaver bone and 20 three-dimensional surface models of human femora. Radiograms and computed tomography scans were taken before and after applying a controlled fracture to the bone. A 3D scan of the fracture was acquired using a mobile fluoroscope (Siemens Siremobil). The fracture was fitted into the generic bone models by rigid registration using a modified least-squares algorithm. Registration precision was determined and a clinical appraisal of the composite models obtained. RESULTS: Twenty composite bone models were generated. Average registration precision was 2.0 mm (range 1.6 to 2.6). Average processing time on a laptop computer was 35 s (range 20 to 55). Comparing synthesized radiograms with the actual radiograms of the fractured bone yielded clinically satisfactory results. CONCLUSION: A three-dimensional full-length representation of a fractured bone can reliably be synthesized from a short scan of the patient's fracture and a generic bone model. This patient-specific model can subsequently be used for teaching, surgical operation planning, and intraoperative visualization purposes.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Feb 2010 17:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0897-1889
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10278-007-9078-8
PubMed ID:17885790

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