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Interleukin-18 levels are associated with low-density lipoproteins size


Berneis, K; Rizzo, M; Evans, J; Rini, G B; Spinas, G A; Goedecke, J H (2010). Interleukin-18 levels are associated with low-density lipoproteins size. European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 40(1):54-55.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Both low-density lipoproteins (LDL) size and serum interleukin (IL)-18 levels have been shown to be predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, it is still unknown whether IL-18 levels are independently associated with LDL size. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study including 53 premenopausal women (18-45 years), LDL size (by gradient gel electrophoresis), serum IL-18, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum lipids, insulin sensitivity (S(I), by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test) were measured. RESULTS: LDL size correlated with IL-18 (r = -0.38, P = 0.006), hs-CRP (r = -0.40, P = 0.003), S(I) (r = 0.36, P = 0.011), serum triglycerides (r = -0.32, P = 0.018) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL)-cholesterol (r = 0.40, P = 0.003). When these variables were entered into a regression model, serum IL-18 (beta = -0.26, P = 0.04), triglycerides (beta = -0.29, P = 0.02) and HDL-cholesterol (beta = 0.34, P = 0.01) levels were independently associated with LDL size, accounting for 42% of the variance (P < 0.001). Serum hs-CRP levels and S(I) were not significant independent predictors of LDL size in this model. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report showing that elevated IL-18 levels are associated with reduced LDL size, independent of other inflammatory and metabolic risk factors. Future prospective studies are needed to evaluate the predictive role of IL-18 as an inflammatory marker of LDL size and the development of subclinical and/or clinical atherosclerosis.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Both low-density lipoproteins (LDL) size and serum interleukin (IL)-18 levels have been shown to be predictors of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, it is still unknown whether IL-18 levels are independently associated with LDL size. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study including 53 premenopausal women (18-45 years), LDL size (by gradient gel electrophoresis), serum IL-18, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum lipids, insulin sensitivity (S(I), by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test) were measured. RESULTS: LDL size correlated with IL-18 (r = -0.38, P = 0.006), hs-CRP (r = -0.40, P = 0.003), S(I) (r = 0.36, P = 0.011), serum triglycerides (r = -0.32, P = 0.018) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL)-cholesterol (r = 0.40, P = 0.003). When these variables were entered into a regression model, serum IL-18 (beta = -0.26, P = 0.04), triglycerides (beta = -0.29, P = 0.02) and HDL-cholesterol (beta = 0.34, P = 0.01) levels were independently associated with LDL size, accounting for 42% of the variance (P < 0.001). Serum hs-CRP levels and S(I) were not significant independent predictors of LDL size in this model. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report showing that elevated IL-18 levels are associated with reduced LDL size, independent of other inflammatory and metabolic risk factors. Future prospective studies are needed to evaluate the predictive role of IL-18 as an inflammatory marker of LDL size and the development of subclinical and/or clinical atherosclerosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2010
Deposited On:15 Feb 2010 13:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:54
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0014-2972
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2362.2009.02228.x
PubMed ID:19968699

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