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Recall rate and positive predictive value of MSUD screening is not influenced by hydroxyproline


Fingerhut, R (2009). Recall rate and positive predictive value of MSUD screening is not influenced by hydroxyproline. European Journal of Pediatrics, 168(5):599-604.

Abstract

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by the deficiency of the branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (BCOA-DH) complex. The worldwide incidence is approximately 1 in 185,000. MSUD is integrated in many "expanded" newborn screening (NBS) programs that use electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Elevated leucine, isoleucine, and alloisoleucine in the dried blood samples (DBS) of newborns are diagnostic parameters. However, with the applied method, it is not possible to distinguish the amino acids from each other, and also not from the other isobaric amino acid, hydroxyproline. While the branched chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine, and alloisoleucine are no diagnostic problem, because they are all elevated in MSUD patients, and, rather, increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, hydroxyproline may cause false-positive screening results. Hydroxyproline is elevated in the benign familial condition hyperhydroxyprolinemia, which needs no medical intervention. The detection of cases with hyperhydroxyprolinemia have formerly been reported from screening programs that used thin-layer chromatography for phenylketonuria (PKU) screening, and, recently, two more cases have been reported, detected by ESI-MS/MS-based NBS. However, the detection of non-diseases is a heavy burden for screening programs and should be avoided if possible. With optimal settings for the quantitation of BCAAs and interpretation rules, elevated hydroxyproline should not cause false-positive screening results.

Abstract

Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by the deficiency of the branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase (BCOA-DH) complex. The worldwide incidence is approximately 1 in 185,000. MSUD is integrated in many "expanded" newborn screening (NBS) programs that use electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Elevated leucine, isoleucine, and alloisoleucine in the dried blood samples (DBS) of newborns are diagnostic parameters. However, with the applied method, it is not possible to distinguish the amino acids from each other, and also not from the other isobaric amino acid, hydroxyproline. While the branched chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine, and alloisoleucine are no diagnostic problem, because they are all elevated in MSUD patients, and, rather, increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, hydroxyproline may cause false-positive screening results. Hydroxyproline is elevated in the benign familial condition hyperhydroxyprolinemia, which needs no medical intervention. The detection of cases with hyperhydroxyprolinemia have formerly been reported from screening programs that used thin-layer chromatography for phenylketonuria (PKU) screening, and, recently, two more cases have been reported, detected by ESI-MS/MS-based NBS. However, the detection of non-diseases is a heavy burden for screening programs and should be avoided if possible. With optimal settings for the quantitation of BCAAs and interpretation rules, elevated hydroxyproline should not cause false-positive screening results.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 09:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:56
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-6199
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00431-008-0804-0
PubMed ID:18682982

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