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Pediatric supratentorial ependymomas show more frequent deletions on chromosome 9 than infratentorial ependymomas: a microsatellite analysis


Schneider, D; Monoranu, C M; Huang, B; Rutkowski, S; Gerber, N U; Krauss, J; Puppe, B; Roggendorf, W (2009). Pediatric supratentorial ependymomas show more frequent deletions on chromosome 9 than infratentorial ependymomas: a microsatellite analysis. Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, 191(2):90-96.

Abstract

Numerous human malignancies, including brain tumors, have been reported to show aberrations on chromosome 9. In our previous screening study in ependymomas, we used microsatellite analysis to identify frequent aberrations on this chromosome. To refine our preliminary analysis of candidate regions, here we use 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers spanning the entire chromosome 9. A total of 48 pairs of matched normal and tumor specimens from patients with ependymoma, including 28 children (mean age, 4.4 years) and 20 adults (mean age, 44.9 years), were genotyped. Allelic imbalances were found in 30/48 patients (62.5%). Pediatric tumors, which were predominantly anaplastic, showed fewer aberrations (57.1%) than adult tumors (70%), and two common regions of deletions were identified (9p21.1 approximately p22.3 and 9q31.3 approximately q33.2). We found that 9q31.3 approximately q33.2, an approximately 8.5-megabase segment containing the DCR1 gene, exhibited the highest number of aberrations (n=33). Adults with ependymomas harboring aberrations on chromosome 9 (n=14) showed significantly longer overall survival than patients of the same group without this aberration (n=6; P=0.034), irrespective of the extent of resection in multivariate analysis. Aberrations of chromosome 9, and particularly of DCR1, may play a role in the prognostic evaluation for ependymomas in adults in the future. In pediatric patients, genetic aberrations were found significantly more often in supratentorial tumors than in tumors with infratentorial location (P=0.007). This result may underscore differences in the origin of these tumors.

Abstract

Numerous human malignancies, including brain tumors, have been reported to show aberrations on chromosome 9. In our previous screening study in ependymomas, we used microsatellite analysis to identify frequent aberrations on this chromosome. To refine our preliminary analysis of candidate regions, here we use 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers spanning the entire chromosome 9. A total of 48 pairs of matched normal and tumor specimens from patients with ependymoma, including 28 children (mean age, 4.4 years) and 20 adults (mean age, 44.9 years), were genotyped. Allelic imbalances were found in 30/48 patients (62.5%). Pediatric tumors, which were predominantly anaplastic, showed fewer aberrations (57.1%) than adult tumors (70%), and two common regions of deletions were identified (9p21.1 approximately p22.3 and 9q31.3 approximately q33.2). We found that 9q31.3 approximately q33.2, an approximately 8.5-megabase segment containing the DCR1 gene, exhibited the highest number of aberrations (n=33). Adults with ependymomas harboring aberrations on chromosome 9 (n=14) showed significantly longer overall survival than patients of the same group without this aberration (n=6; P=0.034), irrespective of the extent of resection in multivariate analysis. Aberrations of chromosome 9, and particularly of DCR1, may play a role in the prognostic evaluation for ependymomas in adults in the future. In pediatric patients, genetic aberrations were found significantly more often in supratentorial tumors than in tumors with infratentorial location (P=0.007). This result may underscore differences in the origin of these tumors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:09 Mar 2010 14:20
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 00:23
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-4608
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cancergencyto.2009.02.010
PubMed ID:19446744

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