Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Time related changes in luteal prostaglandin synthesis and steroidogenic capacity during pregnancy, normal and antiprogestin induced luteolysis in the bitch


Kowalewski, M P; Beceriklisoy, H B; Aslan, S; Agaoglu, A R; Hoffmann, B (2009). Time related changes in luteal prostaglandin synthesis and steroidogenic capacity during pregnancy, normal and antiprogestin induced luteolysis in the bitch. Animal Reproduction Science, 116(1-2):129-138.

Abstract

In nonpregnant and pregnant dogs the corpora lutea (CL) are the only source of progesterone (P4) which shows an almost identical secretion pattern until the rapid decrease of P4 prior to parturition. For the nonpregnant dog clear evidence has been obtained that physiological luteal regression is devoid of a functional role of the PGF2alpha-system and seems to depend on the provision of StAR. Yet in pregnant dogs the rapid prepartal luteal regression, coinciding with an increase of PGF2alpha, may be indicative for different regulatory mechanisms. To assess this situation and by applying semi-quantitative Real Time (Taq Man) RT-PCR, expression patterns were determined for the following factors in CL of pregnant and prepartal dogs and of mid-pregnant dogs treated with the antiprogestin Aglepristone: cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2), prostaglandin E2 synthase (PGES), prostaglandin F2alpha synthase (PGFS), its receptors (EP2, EP4 an FP), the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 3beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3betaHSD) and the progesterone receptor (PR). Peripheral plasma P4 concentrations were determined by RIA. CL were collected via ovariohysterectomy from pregnant bitches (n=3-5) on days 8-12 (Group 1, pre-implantation period), days 18-25 (Group 2, post-implantation period), days 35-40 (Group 3, mid-gestation period) and during the prepartal progesterone decline (Group 4). Additionally, CL were obtained from groups of 5 mid-pregnant dogs (days 40-45) 24h, respectively 72h after the second treatment with Aglepristone. Expression of Cox2 and PGES was highest during the pre-implantation period, that of PGFS and FP during the post-implantation period. EP4 and EP2 revealed a constant expression pattern throughout pregnancy with a prepartal upregulation of EP2. 3betaHSD and StAR decreased significantly from the pre-implatation period to prepartal luteolysis, it was matched by the course of P4 concentrations. Expression of the PR was higher during mid-gestation and prepartal luteolysis than in the two preceding periods. After application of Aglepristone the overall mRNA-expression resembled the situation during prepartal luteolysis except for EP2, which remained unchanged. These data suggest that - as in the nonpregnant bitch - also in the pregnant bitch luteal production of prostaglandins is associated with luteal support rather than luteolysis. On the other hand induction of luteolysis by the PR blocker Aglepristone points to a role of luteal P4 as an autocrine factor in a positive loop feedback system controlling the availability of P4, StAR and 3betaHSD.

Abstract

In nonpregnant and pregnant dogs the corpora lutea (CL) are the only source of progesterone (P4) which shows an almost identical secretion pattern until the rapid decrease of P4 prior to parturition. For the nonpregnant dog clear evidence has been obtained that physiological luteal regression is devoid of a functional role of the PGF2alpha-system and seems to depend on the provision of StAR. Yet in pregnant dogs the rapid prepartal luteal regression, coinciding with an increase of PGF2alpha, may be indicative for different regulatory mechanisms. To assess this situation and by applying semi-quantitative Real Time (Taq Man) RT-PCR, expression patterns were determined for the following factors in CL of pregnant and prepartal dogs and of mid-pregnant dogs treated with the antiprogestin Aglepristone: cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2), prostaglandin E2 synthase (PGES), prostaglandin F2alpha synthase (PGFS), its receptors (EP2, EP4 an FP), the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 3beta-hydroxysteroid-dehydrogenase (3betaHSD) and the progesterone receptor (PR). Peripheral plasma P4 concentrations were determined by RIA. CL were collected via ovariohysterectomy from pregnant bitches (n=3-5) on days 8-12 (Group 1, pre-implantation period), days 18-25 (Group 2, post-implantation period), days 35-40 (Group 3, mid-gestation period) and during the prepartal progesterone decline (Group 4). Additionally, CL were obtained from groups of 5 mid-pregnant dogs (days 40-45) 24h, respectively 72h after the second treatment with Aglepristone. Expression of Cox2 and PGES was highest during the pre-implantation period, that of PGFS and FP during the post-implantation period. EP4 and EP2 revealed a constant expression pattern throughout pregnancy with a prepartal upregulation of EP2. 3betaHSD and StAR decreased significantly from the pre-implatation period to prepartal luteolysis, it was matched by the course of P4 concentrations. Expression of the PR was higher during mid-gestation and prepartal luteolysis than in the two preceding periods. After application of Aglepristone the overall mRNA-expression resembled the situation during prepartal luteolysis except for EP2, which remained unchanged. These data suggest that - as in the nonpregnant bitch - also in the pregnant bitch luteal production of prostaglandins is associated with luteal support rather than luteolysis. On the other hand induction of luteolysis by the PR blocker Aglepristone points to a role of luteal P4 as an autocrine factor in a positive loop feedback system controlling the availability of P4, StAR and 3betaHSD.

Statistics

Citations

37 citations in Web of Science®
37 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 17 Feb 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:November 2009
Deposited On:17 Feb 2010 11:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 13:57
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0378-4320
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anireprosci.2008.12.011
PubMed ID:19162415

Download