Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The effects of forest phenology and floristics on populations of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Are Sumatran forests better orangutan habitat than Bornean forests?


Marshall, A J; Ancrenaz, M; Brearley, F Q; Fredriksson, G M; Ghaffar, N; Heydon, M; Husson, S J; Leighton, M; McConkey, K R; Morrogh-Bernard, H C; Proctor, J; van Schaik, C P; Yeager, C P; Wich, S A (2009). The effects of forest phenology and floristics on populations of Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. Are Sumatran forests better orangutan habitat than Bornean forests? In: Wich, S A; Utami Atmoko, S S; Mitra Setia, T; van Schaik, C P. Orangutans: geographic variation in behavioral ecology and conservation. New York, US: Oxford University Press, 97-117.

Abstract

It has long been assumed that Sumatran forests are of higher quality for orangutans than Bornean forests, and that this is both the proximate and ultimate cause of many of the differences in socio-ecology between the two orangutan species. Yet this hypothesis has remained untested. This chapter presents data on the phenology and floristics of eight Bornean and three Sumatran forest sites where orangutans have been studied to examine the effects of floristic composition, habitat productivity, and seasonality on orangutan population density. The alternative hypotheses that higher orangutan densities in Sumatra are due to overall higher levels of plant productivity, the increased availability of preferred foods, the presence of more fallback foods, or differences in floristic composition between the two islands are tested empirically.

Abstract

It has long been assumed that Sumatran forests are of higher quality for orangutans than Bornean forests, and that this is both the proximate and ultimate cause of many of the differences in socio-ecology between the two orangutan species. Yet this hypothesis has remained untested. This chapter presents data on the phenology and floristics of eight Bornean and three Sumatran forest sites where orangutans have been studied to examine the effects of floristic composition, habitat productivity, and seasonality on orangutan population density. The alternative hypotheses that higher orangutan densities in Sumatra are due to overall higher levels of plant productivity, the increased availability of preferred foods, the presence of more fallback foods, or differences in floristic composition between the two islands are tested empirically.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 18 Feb 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:18 Feb 2010 16:32
Last Modified:14 Sep 2016 13:42
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISBN:978-0-19-921327-6
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213276.003.0007
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005683706
http://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo_library/libweb/action/search.do?fn=search&mode=Advanced&vid=ZAD&vl%28186672378UI0%29=isbn&vl%281UI0%29=contains&vl%28freeText0%29=978-0-19-921327-6

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher