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Foraging and ranging behavior during a fallback episode: Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii compared


Vogel, E R; Haag, L; Mitra-Setia, T; van Schaik, C P; Dominy, N J (2009). Foraging and ranging behavior during a fallback episode: Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii compared. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 140(4):716-726.

Abstract

Periodic episodes of food scarcity may highlight the adaptive value of certain anatomical traits, particularly those that facilitate the acquisition and digestion
of exigent fallback foods. To better understand the
selective pressures that favored the distinctive dental and
locomotor morphologies of gibbons and orangutans, we
examined the foraging and ranging behavior of sympatric
Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii during
an episode of low fruit availability at Tuanan, Kalimantan
Tengah, Indonesia. We found that Hylobates ranged 0.5 km day21 or 33% farther than did Pongo, but the overall daily ranging of both species did not vary as fruit availability decreased by as much as 50%. Among gibbons, we observed dietary switching to fallback foods; in particular, there was a progressively greater reliance on figs, liana products, and unripe fruit. Orangutans relied heavily on unripe fruit and fracture-resistant bark and pith tissues.

Abstract

Periodic episodes of food scarcity may highlight the adaptive value of certain anatomical traits, particularly those that facilitate the acquisition and digestion
of exigent fallback foods. To better understand the
selective pressures that favored the distinctive dental and
locomotor morphologies of gibbons and orangutans, we
examined the foraging and ranging behavior of sympatric
Hylobates albibarbis and Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii during
an episode of low fruit availability at Tuanan, Kalimantan
Tengah, Indonesia. We found that Hylobates ranged 0.5 km day21 or 33% farther than did Pongo, but the overall daily ranging of both species did not vary as fruit availability decreased by as much as 50%. Among gibbons, we observed dietary switching to fallback foods; in particular, there was a progressively greater reliance on figs, liana products, and unripe fruit. Orangutans relied heavily on unripe fruit and fracture-resistant bark and pith tissues.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Mar 2010 19:36
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 01:08
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0002-9483
Additional Information:Special Issue: The Importance of Fallback Foods in Primate Ecology and Evolution
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.21119
PubMed ID:19890870

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