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Heterogeneity of the MYCN oncogene in neuroblastoma


Theissen, J; Boensch, M; Spitz, R; Betts, D; Stegmaier, S; Christiansen, H; Niggli, F; Schilling, F; Schwab, M; Simon, T; Westermann, F; Berthold, F; Hero, B (2009). Heterogeneity of the MYCN oncogene in neuroblastoma. Clinical Cancer Research, 15(6):2085-2090.

Abstract

PURPOSE: MYCN amplification is an important therapy-stratifying marker in neuroblastoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with signal detection on the single-cell level allows a critical judgement of MYCN intratumoral heterogeneity. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The MYCN status was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization at diagnosis and relapse. Heterogeneity was defined as the simultaneous presence of amplified cells (>/=5 cells per slide) and nonamplified cells within one tumor or sequential change of the amplification status during the course of the disease. Likewise, heterogeneity can be detected between primary tumor and metastasis. RESULTS: From 1,341 patients analyzed, 1,071 showed no amplification, 250 showed homogeneous amplification, and 20 patients showed MYCN heterogeneity. Of the patients with heterogeneity, 12 of 20 had clusters of MYCN amplifications, 3 of 20 had amplified single cells, 3 of 20 showed MYCN amplifications in the bone marrow but not in the primary tumor, and 2 of 20 acquired MYCN amplification during the course of the disease. All stage 4 patients were treated according to high-risk protocols; 7 of 8 later progressed. Four patients with localized disease were treated according to high-risk protocol because of MYCN-amplified clusters; 1 of 4 later progressed. One patient treated with mild chemotherapy experienced progression. Seven patients with localized/4S disease underwent no chemotherapy: 4 of 5 patients with MYCN heterogeneity at diagnosis remained disease-free, and 1 of 5 experienced local progression. Two patients had normal MYCN status at diagnosis but acquired MYCN amplification during the course of the disease. CONCLUSION: MYCN heterogeneity is rare. Our results suggest that small amounts of MYCN-amplified cells are not correlated to adverse outcomes. More patients with heterogeneity are warranted to clarify the role of MYCN heterogeneity for risk classification.

Abstract

PURPOSE: MYCN amplification is an important therapy-stratifying marker in neuroblastoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with signal detection on the single-cell level allows a critical judgement of MYCN intratumoral heterogeneity. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The MYCN status was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization at diagnosis and relapse. Heterogeneity was defined as the simultaneous presence of amplified cells (>/=5 cells per slide) and nonamplified cells within one tumor or sequential change of the amplification status during the course of the disease. Likewise, heterogeneity can be detected between primary tumor and metastasis. RESULTS: From 1,341 patients analyzed, 1,071 showed no amplification, 250 showed homogeneous amplification, and 20 patients showed MYCN heterogeneity. Of the patients with heterogeneity, 12 of 20 had clusters of MYCN amplifications, 3 of 20 had amplified single cells, 3 of 20 showed MYCN amplifications in the bone marrow but not in the primary tumor, and 2 of 20 acquired MYCN amplification during the course of the disease. All stage 4 patients were treated according to high-risk protocols; 7 of 8 later progressed. Four patients with localized disease were treated according to high-risk protocol because of MYCN-amplified clusters; 1 of 4 later progressed. One patient treated with mild chemotherapy experienced progression. Seven patients with localized/4S disease underwent no chemotherapy: 4 of 5 patients with MYCN heterogeneity at diagnosis remained disease-free, and 1 of 5 experienced local progression. Two patients had normal MYCN status at diagnosis but acquired MYCN amplification during the course of the disease. CONCLUSION: MYCN heterogeneity is rare. Our results suggest that small amounts of MYCN-amplified cells are not correlated to adverse outcomes. More patients with heterogeneity are warranted to clarify the role of MYCN heterogeneity for risk classification.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:16 Mar 2010 08:59
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 00:38
Publisher:American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN:1078-0432
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-08-1648

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