Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Studies on nanostructured Bi2WO6: convenient hydrothermal and TiO2­Coating pathways


Zhou, Y; Vuille, K; Heel, A; Patzke, Greta R (2009). Studies on nanostructured Bi2WO6: convenient hydrothermal and TiO2­Coating pathways. Zeitschrift für Anorganische und Allgemeine Chemie, 635(12):1848-1855.

Abstract

Bismuth tungstate is an important conductor and photocatalyst that keeps attracting research interest due to its promising catalytic activity under visible light irradiation. The 2D Aurivillius-type structure of Bi2WO6 promotes its tendency towards the formation of nanosheets that can be converted into hierarchically structured Bi2WO6 microspheres. As their formation mechanism varies strongly with the preparative parameters and further investigations are required, we present studies on the most direct and convenient access to Bi2WO6 nano-architectures developed hitherto. Our one-step approach towards this key material is based on the immediate hydrothermal reaction of Bi(NO3)3·5H2O with K2WO4 that proceeds through a mechanism that differs from the previously observed routes. These insights are essential for the development of straightforward technical processes in order to produce nanomaterials without complicated parameter adjustments. The resulting Bi2WO6 nanostructures display high photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. For the first time, the influence of an inorganic additive, K2SO4, is investigated in the Bi(NO3)3·5H2O/K2WO4 hydrothermal system. This paved the way to the synthesis and stabilization of other bismuth oxide-based materials at lower temperatures. Furthermore, we developed a flexible and efficient solution-based coating process to cover the hierarchical Bi2WO6 arrangements with a thin layer of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

Abstract

Bismuth tungstate is an important conductor and photocatalyst that keeps attracting research interest due to its promising catalytic activity under visible light irradiation. The 2D Aurivillius-type structure of Bi2WO6 promotes its tendency towards the formation of nanosheets that can be converted into hierarchically structured Bi2WO6 microspheres. As their formation mechanism varies strongly with the preparative parameters and further investigations are required, we present studies on the most direct and convenient access to Bi2WO6 nano-architectures developed hitherto. Our one-step approach towards this key material is based on the immediate hydrothermal reaction of Bi(NO3)3·5H2O with K2WO4 that proceeds through a mechanism that differs from the previously observed routes. These insights are essential for the development of straightforward technical processes in order to produce nanomaterials without complicated parameter adjustments. The resulting Bi2WO6 nanostructures display high photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation. For the first time, the influence of an inorganic additive, K2SO4, is investigated in the Bi(NO3)3·5H2O/K2WO4 hydrothermal system. This paved the way to the synthesis and stabilization of other bismuth oxide-based materials at lower temperatures. Furthermore, we developed a flexible and efficient solution-based coating process to cover the hierarchical Bi2WO6 arrangements with a thin layer of anatase TiO2 nanoparticles.

Statistics

Citations

28 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Mar 2010 13:51
Last Modified:07 May 2017 07:29
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0044-2313
Additional Information:Special Issue: Dedicated to Professor Martin Jansen on the occasion of his 65th birthday
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/zaac.200900187

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations