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Regulation of human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 in transgenic mice: influence of castration, testosterone, and growth hormone


Löfgren, S; Baldwin, R M; Carlerös, M; Terelius, Y; Fransson-Steen, R; Mwinyi, J; Waxman, D J; Ingelman-Sundberg, M (2009). Regulation of human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 in transgenic mice: influence of castration, testosterone, and growth hormone. Drug Metabolism and Disposition, 37(7):1505-1512.

Abstract

The hormonal regulation of human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19, which are expressed in a male-specific manner in liver and kidney in a mouse transgenic model, was examined. The influence of prepubertal castration in male mice and testosterone treatment of female mice was investigated, as was the effect of continuous administration of growth hormone (GH) to transgenic males. Prepubertal castration of transgenic male mice suppressed the expression of CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 in liver and kidney to female levels, whereas expression was increased for the endogenous female-specific mouse hepatic genes Cyp2c37, Cyp2c38, Cyp2c39, and Cyp2c40. Testosterone treatment of female mice increased CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 expression in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, but was without effect in brain or small intestine, where gene expression was not gender-dependent. Continuous GH treatment of transgenic males for 7 days suppressed hepatic expression of CYP2C19 (>90% decrease) and CYP2C18 ( approximately 50% decrease) but had minimal effect on the expression of these genes in kidney, brain, or small intestine. Under these conditions, continuous GH induced all four female-specific mouse liver Cyp2c genes in males to normal female levels. These studies indicate that the human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 genes contain regulatory elements that respond to the endogenous mouse hormonal profiles, with androgen being the primary regulator of male-specific expression in kidney, whereas the androgen-dependent pituitary GH secretory pattern is the primary regulator of male-specific expression in liver in a manner that is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gender-specific hepatic genes.

Abstract

The hormonal regulation of human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19, which are expressed in a male-specific manner in liver and kidney in a mouse transgenic model, was examined. The influence of prepubertal castration in male mice and testosterone treatment of female mice was investigated, as was the effect of continuous administration of growth hormone (GH) to transgenic males. Prepubertal castration of transgenic male mice suppressed the expression of CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 in liver and kidney to female levels, whereas expression was increased for the endogenous female-specific mouse hepatic genes Cyp2c37, Cyp2c38, Cyp2c39, and Cyp2c40. Testosterone treatment of female mice increased CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 expression in kidney, and to a lesser extent in liver, but was without effect in brain or small intestine, where gene expression was not gender-dependent. Continuous GH treatment of transgenic males for 7 days suppressed hepatic expression of CYP2C19 (>90% decrease) and CYP2C18 ( approximately 50% decrease) but had minimal effect on the expression of these genes in kidney, brain, or small intestine. Under these conditions, continuous GH induced all four female-specific mouse liver Cyp2c genes in males to normal female levels. These studies indicate that the human CYP2C18 and CYP2C19 genes contain regulatory elements that respond to the endogenous mouse hormonal profiles, with androgen being the primary regulator of male-specific expression in kidney, whereas the androgen-dependent pituitary GH secretory pattern is the primary regulator of male-specific expression in liver in a manner that is similar to the regulation of the endogenous gender-specific hepatic genes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Mar 2010 16:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:01
Publisher:American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
ISSN:0090-9556
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1124/dmd.109.026963
PubMed ID:19339376

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