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Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are downregulated in primary breast cancer


Boneberg, E M; Legler, D F; Hoefer, M M; Ohlschlegel, C; Steininger, H; Füzesi, L; Beer, G M; Dupont-Lampert, V; Otto, F; Senn, H J; Fürstenberger, G (2009). Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are downregulated in primary breast cancer. British Journal of Cancer, 101(4):605-614.

Abstract

Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are considered to play key roles in tumour growth, progression and metastasis. However, targeting tumour angiogenesis in clinical trials showed only modest efficacy. We therefore scrutinised the concept of tumour angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by analysing the expression of crucial markers involved in these processes in primary breast cancer.
Methods: We analysed the expression of angiogenic, lymphangiogenic or antiangiogenic factors, their respective receptors and specific markers for endothelial and lymphendothelial cells by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in primary breast cancer and compared the expression profiles to non-cancerous, tumour-adjacent tissues and breast tissues from healthy women.
Results: We found decreased mRNA amounts of major angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors in tumour compared to healthy tissues, whereas antiangiogenic factors were upregulated. Concomitantly, angiogenic and lymphangiogenic receptors were downregulated in breast tumours. This antiangiogenic, antilymphangiogenic microenvironment was even more pronounced in aggressive tumours and accompanied by reduced amounts of endothelial and lymphatic endothelial cell markers.
Conclusion: Primary breast tumours are not a site of highly active angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Selection for tumour cells that survive with minimal vascular supply may account for this observation in clinical apparent tumours.

Abstract

Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are considered to play key roles in tumour growth, progression and metastasis. However, targeting tumour angiogenesis in clinical trials showed only modest efficacy. We therefore scrutinised the concept of tumour angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis by analysing the expression of crucial markers involved in these processes in primary breast cancer.
Methods: We analysed the expression of angiogenic, lymphangiogenic or antiangiogenic factors, their respective receptors and specific markers for endothelial and lymphendothelial cells by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in primary breast cancer and compared the expression profiles to non-cancerous, tumour-adjacent tissues and breast tissues from healthy women.
Results: We found decreased mRNA amounts of major angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors in tumour compared to healthy tissues, whereas antiangiogenic factors were upregulated. Concomitantly, angiogenic and lymphangiogenic receptors were downregulated in breast tumours. This antiangiogenic, antilymphangiogenic microenvironment was even more pronounced in aggressive tumours and accompanied by reduced amounts of endothelial and lymphatic endothelial cell markers.
Conclusion: Primary breast tumours are not a site of highly active angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Selection for tumour cells that survive with minimal vascular supply may account for this observation in clinical apparent tumours.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:18 August 2009
Deposited On:04 Mar 2010 13:39
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 01:47
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0007-0920
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6605219

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