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Posttraumatic stress disorder and dyslipidemia: Previous research and novel findings from patients with PTSD caused by myocardial infarction


von Känel, R; Kraemer, B; Saner, H; Schmid, J P; Abbas, C C; Begré, S (2010). Posttraumatic stress disorder and dyslipidemia: Previous research and novel findings from patients with PTSD caused by myocardial infarction. World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 11(2):141-147.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Based on a brief systematic review suggesting dyslipidemia in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we studied, for the first time, levels of blood lipids in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of PTSD caused by myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: Study participants were eight patients with full PTSD, eight patients with subsyndromal PTSD, and 31 patients with no PTSD who were diagnosed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) interview after a mean of 32+/-8 months after MI. Levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) were determined in plasma. RESULTS: Patients with full PTSD had lower HDL-C than patients with subsyndromal PTSD (P = 0.044) and those with no PTSD (P = 0.014) controlling for sex, body mass index, and statin equivalent dosage. Moreover, HDL-C levels were inversely associated with PTSD total symptoms (r = -0.33, P = 0.027), re-experiencing symptoms (r = -0.32, P = 0.036), and avoidance symptoms (r = -0.34, P = 0.025). There were no significant associations of PTSD diagnostic status and symptomatology with the three other lipid measures. CONCLUSION: Chronic PTSD caused by MI was associated with lower plasma levels of HDL-C. The finding concurs with the notion of dyslipidemia partially underlying the atherosclerotic risk in individuals with PTSD caused by different types of trauma.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Based on a brief systematic review suggesting dyslipidemia in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we studied, for the first time, levels of blood lipids in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of PTSD caused by myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: Study participants were eight patients with full PTSD, eight patients with subsyndromal PTSD, and 31 patients with no PTSD who were diagnosed using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) interview after a mean of 32+/-8 months after MI. Levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) were determined in plasma. RESULTS: Patients with full PTSD had lower HDL-C than patients with subsyndromal PTSD (P = 0.044) and those with no PTSD (P = 0.014) controlling for sex, body mass index, and statin equivalent dosage. Moreover, HDL-C levels were inversely associated with PTSD total symptoms (r = -0.33, P = 0.027), re-experiencing symptoms (r = -0.32, P = 0.036), and avoidance symptoms (r = -0.34, P = 0.025). There were no significant associations of PTSD diagnostic status and symptomatology with the three other lipid measures. CONCLUSION: Chronic PTSD caused by MI was associated with lower plasma levels of HDL-C. The finding concurs with the notion of dyslipidemia partially underlying the atherosclerotic risk in individuals with PTSD caused by different types of trauma.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2010
Deposited On:07 Apr 2010 07:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:04
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1562-2975
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3109/15622970903449846
PubMed ID:20109110

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