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Despite modern off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting women fare worse than men


Emmert, M Y; Salzberg, S P; Seifert, Burkhardt; Schurr, U P; Odavic, D; Reuthebuch, O; Genoni, M (2010). Despite modern off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting women fare worse than men. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 10(5):737-742.

Abstract

Female gender is an established risk factor for worse outcomes after cardiac surgery. Avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for coronary bypass grafting has an unknown effect on gender differences. Herein, we evaluate if gender has an impact on outcomes after modern off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). From 2002 to 2007, we analyzed 983 patients (male: n=807/female: n=176) who underwent OPCAB with symptomatic multi-vessel disease at our institution. The link between gender and outcome was assessed by multivariate analysis and logistic regression. A composite endpoint was constructed from: 30-day-mortality, renal failure, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay, neurological complications, use of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and conversion to CPB. Mortality was 3.2% in women vs.1.8% in men (P=0.15) and the EuroSCORE was significantly correlated to gender (6.8 vs. 5.2; P<0.001), even after correction (P=0.036). Significant more occurrence of the composite endpoint was noted in women (39.8% vs. 29.0%; P=0.007) whereas for men the risk was much lower [odds ratio (OR) 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46–0.92; P=0.015]. For both genders the logistic regression revealed a risk increase of 15% per one-point-increase of EuroSCORE (corrected) (OR 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10–1.19; P<0.0001). Women had more frequently a prolonged stay at ICU (P=0.006) and had a higher stroke rate (2.3% vs. 1.2%; P=0.29). Complete revascularization was achieved similarly (95% vs. 94%; P=0.93). OPCAB offers low mortality and excellent clinical outcome. Women are more likely to experience postoperative complications. Even if partially neutralized by avoiding CPB, gender differences remain present with modern OPCAB strategies.

Abstract

Female gender is an established risk factor for worse outcomes after cardiac surgery. Avoiding cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for coronary bypass grafting has an unknown effect on gender differences. Herein, we evaluate if gender has an impact on outcomes after modern off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). From 2002 to 2007, we analyzed 983 patients (male: n=807/female: n=176) who underwent OPCAB with symptomatic multi-vessel disease at our institution. The link between gender and outcome was assessed by multivariate analysis and logistic regression. A composite endpoint was constructed from: 30-day-mortality, renal failure, prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay, neurological complications, use of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and conversion to CPB. Mortality was 3.2% in women vs.1.8% in men (P=0.15) and the EuroSCORE was significantly correlated to gender (6.8 vs. 5.2; P<0.001), even after correction (P=0.036). Significant more occurrence of the composite endpoint was noted in women (39.8% vs. 29.0%; P=0.007) whereas for men the risk was much lower [odds ratio (OR) 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46–0.92; P=0.015]. For both genders the logistic regression revealed a risk increase of 15% per one-point-increase of EuroSCORE (corrected) (OR 1.15; 95% CI: 1.10–1.19; P<0.0001). Women had more frequently a prolonged stay at ICU (P=0.006) and had a higher stroke rate (2.3% vs. 1.2%; P=0.29). Complete revascularization was achieved similarly (95% vs. 94%; P=0.93). OPCAB offers low mortality and excellent clinical outcome. Women are more likely to experience postoperative complications. Even if partially neutralized by avoiding CPB, gender differences remain present with modern OPCAB strategies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:14 May 2010 14:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:06
Publisher:European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ISSN:1569-9285
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1510/icvts.2009.220277
Official URL:http://icvts.ctsnetjournals.org/cgi/content/full/10/5/737
PubMed ID:20051452

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