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Outcome of medulloblastoma in children: long-term complications and quality of life


Ribi, K; Relly, C; Landolt, M A; Alber, F D; Boltshauser, E; Grotzer, M A (2005). Outcome of medulloblastoma in children: long-term complications and quality of life. Neuropediatrics, 36(6):357-365.

Abstract

To study the outcomes in long-term survivors of paediatric medulloblastoma (MB), we followed 51 consecutive children who were treated between 1980 and 2000 in a single institution. In 18 of 26 survivors (mean follow-up time 12.2 years), tumour control, neurological, endocrine, and neurocognitive complications and their impact on behavioural and psychological adjustment, and health-related quality of life (QoL) were comprehensively assessed using qualitative and quantitative measures. Endocrine deficits occurred in 61 %, neurological complications in 72 %, and significant school problems in 72 %. All patients had significant deficits in neurocognitive functioning: attention and processing speed was impaired in 79 %, learning and memory in 88 %, language in 56 %, visual perception in 50 %, and executive functions in 64 %. In comparison with healthy controls, social functioning was rated by the patients as the QoL dimension most affected. Parents' ratings were considerably lower than those of the patients. No MB survivor > 18 years of age (n = 12) had a boy- or girlfriend. Because of their treatment, including craniospinal radiotherapy, MB long-time survivors are not only at great risk for neurological, endocrine, and neurocognitive complications, but also of social isolation thereby decreasing self-rated QoL substantially.

Abstract

To study the outcomes in long-term survivors of paediatric medulloblastoma (MB), we followed 51 consecutive children who were treated between 1980 and 2000 in a single institution. In 18 of 26 survivors (mean follow-up time 12.2 years), tumour control, neurological, endocrine, and neurocognitive complications and their impact on behavioural and psychological adjustment, and health-related quality of life (QoL) were comprehensively assessed using qualitative and quantitative measures. Endocrine deficits occurred in 61 %, neurological complications in 72 %, and significant school problems in 72 %. All patients had significant deficits in neurocognitive functioning: attention and processing speed was impaired in 79 %, learning and memory in 88 %, language in 56 %, visual perception in 50 %, and executive functions in 64 %. In comparison with healthy controls, social functioning was rated by the patients as the QoL dimension most affected. Parents' ratings were considerably lower than those of the patients. No MB survivor > 18 years of age (n = 12) had a boy- or girlfriend. Because of their treatment, including craniospinal radiotherapy, MB long-time survivors are not only at great risk for neurological, endocrine, and neurocognitive complications, but also of social isolation thereby decreasing self-rated QoL substantially.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2005
Deposited On:17 May 2010 16:39
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:06
Publisher:Thieme
ISSN:0174-304X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-872880
PubMed ID:16429375

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