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Extracellular matrix of the central nervous system: from neglect to challenge


Zimmermann, D R; Dours-Zimmermann, M (2008). Extracellular matrix of the central nervous system: from neglect to challenge. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 130(4):635-653.

Abstract

The basic concept, that specialized extracellular matrices rich in hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (aggrecan, versican, neurocan, brevican, phosphacan), link proteins and tenascins (Tn-R, Tn-C) can regulate cellular migration and axonal growth and thus, actively participate in the development and maturation of the nervous system, has in recent years gained rapidly expanding experimental support. The swift assembly and remodeling of these matrices have been associated with axonal guidance functions in the periphery and with the structural stabilization of myelinated fiber tracts and synaptic contacts in the maturating central nervous system. Particular interest has been focused on the putative role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in suppressing central nervous system regeneration after lesions. The axon growth inhibitory properties of several of these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in vitro, and the partial recovery of structural plasticity in lesioned animals treated with chondroitin sulfate degrading enzymes in vivo have significantly contributed to the increased awareness of this long time neglected structure.

Abstract

The basic concept, that specialized extracellular matrices rich in hyaluronan, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (aggrecan, versican, neurocan, brevican, phosphacan), link proteins and tenascins (Tn-R, Tn-C) can regulate cellular migration and axonal growth and thus, actively participate in the development and maturation of the nervous system, has in recent years gained rapidly expanding experimental support. The swift assembly and remodeling of these matrices have been associated with axonal guidance functions in the periphery and with the structural stabilization of myelinated fiber tracts and synaptic contacts in the maturating central nervous system. Particular interest has been focused on the putative role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in suppressing central nervous system regeneration after lesions. The axon growth inhibitory properties of several of these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in vitro, and the partial recovery of structural plasticity in lesioned animals treated with chondroitin sulfate degrading enzymes in vivo have significantly contributed to the increased awareness of this long time neglected structure.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Pathology and Molecular Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:23 Oct 2008 08:21
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 09:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0948-6143
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00418-008-0485-9
Official URL:http://www.springerlink.com/content/x70j3u3r55654x60/fulltext.html
PubMed ID:18696101

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