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hMSH2 and hMSH6 play distinct roles in mismatch binding and contribute differently to the ATPase activity of hMutSalpha


Iaccarino, I; Marra, G; Palombo, F; Jiricny, J (1998). hMSH2 and hMSH6 play distinct roles in mismatch binding and contribute differently to the ATPase activity of hMutSalpha. EMBO Journal, 17(9):2677-2686.

Abstract

In extracts of human cells, base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletion loops are bound primarily by hMutSalpha, a heterodimer of hMSH2 and hMSH6 (also known as GTBP or p160). Recombinant hMutSalpha bound a G/T mismatch-containing oligonucleotide with an apparent dissociation constant Kd = 2.6 nM, while its affinity for a homoduplex substrate was >20-fold lower. In the presence of ATP, hMutSalpha dissociated from mismatched oligonucleotide substrates, and this reaction was attenuated by mutating the conserved lysine in the ATP-binding domains of hMSH6, hMSH2 or both to arginine. Surprisingly, this reaction required only ATP binding, not hydrolysis. The ATPase activity of hMutSalpha variants carrying the Lys-->Arg mutation in hMSH2 or in hMSH6 was severely affected, but these mutants were still proficient in mismatch binding and were able to complement, albeit to different extents, mismatch repair-deficient cell extracts. The mismatch binding-proficient, ATPase-deficient double mutant was inactive in the complementation assay and its presence in repair-proficient extracts was inhibitory. We conclude that although the ATPase activity of hMutSalpha is dispensible for mismatch binding, it is required for mismatch correction.

Abstract

In extracts of human cells, base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletion loops are bound primarily by hMutSalpha, a heterodimer of hMSH2 and hMSH6 (also known as GTBP or p160). Recombinant hMutSalpha bound a G/T mismatch-containing oligonucleotide with an apparent dissociation constant Kd = 2.6 nM, while its affinity for a homoduplex substrate was >20-fold lower. In the presence of ATP, hMutSalpha dissociated from mismatched oligonucleotide substrates, and this reaction was attenuated by mutating the conserved lysine in the ATP-binding domains of hMSH6, hMSH2 or both to arginine. Surprisingly, this reaction required only ATP binding, not hydrolysis. The ATPase activity of hMutSalpha variants carrying the Lys-->Arg mutation in hMSH2 or in hMSH6 was severely affected, but these mutants were still proficient in mismatch binding and were able to complement, albeit to different extents, mismatch repair-deficient cell extracts. The mismatch binding-proficient, ATPase-deficient double mutant was inactive in the complementation assay and its presence in repair-proficient extracts was inhibitory. We conclude that although the ATPase activity of hMutSalpha is dispensible for mismatch binding, it is required for mismatch correction.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:1998
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 12:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:09
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0261-4189
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/emboj/17.9.2677
PubMed ID:9564049

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