Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mutation in the magnesium binding site of hMSH6 disables the hMutSalpha sliding clamp from translocating along DNA


Iaccarino, I; Marra, G; Dufner, P; Jiricny, J (2000). Mutation in the magnesium binding site of hMSH6 disables the hMutSalpha sliding clamp from translocating along DNA. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 275(3):2080-2086.

Abstract

In human cells, binding of base/base mismatches and small insertion/deletion loops is mediated by hMutSalpha, a heterodimer of hMSH2 and hMSH6. In the presence of ATP and magnesium, hMutSalpha dissociates from the mismatch by following the DNA contour in the form of a sliding clamp. This process is enabled by a conformational change of the heterodimer, which is driven by the binding of ATP and magnesium in the Walker type A and B motifs of the polypeptides, respectively. We show that a purified recombinant hMutSalpha variant, hMutSalpha 6DV, which contains an aspartate to valine substitution in the Walker type B motif of the hMSH6 subunit, fails to undergo the conformational change compatible with translocation. Instead, its direct dissociation from the mismatch-containing DNA substrate in the presence of ATP and magnesium precludes the assembly of a functional mismatch repair complex. The "translocation-prone" conformation of wild type hMutSalpha could be observed solely under conditions that favor hydrolysis of the nucleotide and mismatch repair in vitro. Thus, whereas magnesium could be substituted with manganese, ATP could not be replaced with its slowly or nonhydrolyzable homologues ATP-gammaS or AMPPNP, respectively. The finding that ATP induces different conformational changes in hMutSalpha in the presence and in the absence of magnesium helps explain the functional differences between hMutSalpha variants incapable of binding ATP as compared with those unable to bind the metal ion.

Abstract

In human cells, binding of base/base mismatches and small insertion/deletion loops is mediated by hMutSalpha, a heterodimer of hMSH2 and hMSH6. In the presence of ATP and magnesium, hMutSalpha dissociates from the mismatch by following the DNA contour in the form of a sliding clamp. This process is enabled by a conformational change of the heterodimer, which is driven by the binding of ATP and magnesium in the Walker type A and B motifs of the polypeptides, respectively. We show that a purified recombinant hMutSalpha variant, hMutSalpha 6DV, which contains an aspartate to valine substitution in the Walker type B motif of the hMSH6 subunit, fails to undergo the conformational change compatible with translocation. Instead, its direct dissociation from the mismatch-containing DNA substrate in the presence of ATP and magnesium precludes the assembly of a functional mismatch repair complex. The "translocation-prone" conformation of wild type hMutSalpha could be observed solely under conditions that favor hydrolysis of the nucleotide and mismatch repair in vitro. Thus, whereas magnesium could be substituted with manganese, ATP could not be replaced with its slowly or nonhydrolyzable homologues ATP-gammaS or AMPPNP, respectively. The finding that ATP induces different conformational changes in hMutSalpha in the presence and in the absence of magnesium helps explain the functional differences between hMutSalpha variants incapable of binding ATP as compared with those unable to bind the metal ion.

Statistics

Citations

58 citations in Web of Science®
59 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 09 Jul 2010
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2000
Deposited On:09 Jul 2010 13:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:09
Publisher:American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
ISSN:0021-9258
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.275.3.2080
PubMed ID:10636912

Download