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Cerebellar cleft: confirmation of the neuroimaging pattern


Poretti, A; Huisman, T A G M; Cowan, F M; Del Giudice, E; Jeannet, P Y; Prayer, D; Rutherford, M A; du Plessis, A J; Limperopoulos, C; Boltshauser, E (2009). Cerebellar cleft: confirmation of the neuroimaging pattern. Neuropediatrics, 40(5):228-233.

Abstract

We recently described the neuroimaging and clinical findings in 6 children with cerebellar clefts and proposed that they result from disruptive changes following prenatal cerebellar hemorrhage. We now report an additional series of 9 patients analyzing the clinical and neuroimaging findings. The clefts were located in the left cerebellar hemisphere in 5 cases, in the right in 3, and bilaterally in one child who had bilateral cerebellar hemorrhages as a preterm infant at 30 weeks gestation. In one patient born at 24 weeks of gestation a unilateral cerebellar hemorrhage has been found at the age of 4 months. Other findings included disordered alignment of the folia and fissures, an irregular gray/white matter junction, and abnormal arborization of the white matter in all cases. Supratentorial abnormalities were found in 4 cases. All but 2 patients were born at term. We confirm the distinct neuroimaging pattern of cerebellar clefts. Considering the documented fetal cerebellar hemorrhage in our first series, we postulate that cerebellar clefts usually represent residual disruptive changes after a prenatal cerebellar hemorrhage. Exceptionally, as now documented in 2 patients, cerebellar clefts can be found after neonatal cerebellar hemorrhages in preterm infants. The short-term outcome in these children was variable.

Abstract

We recently described the neuroimaging and clinical findings in 6 children with cerebellar clefts and proposed that they result from disruptive changes following prenatal cerebellar hemorrhage. We now report an additional series of 9 patients analyzing the clinical and neuroimaging findings. The clefts were located in the left cerebellar hemisphere in 5 cases, in the right in 3, and bilaterally in one child who had bilateral cerebellar hemorrhages as a preterm infant at 30 weeks gestation. In one patient born at 24 weeks of gestation a unilateral cerebellar hemorrhage has been found at the age of 4 months. Other findings included disordered alignment of the folia and fissures, an irregular gray/white matter junction, and abnormal arborization of the white matter in all cases. Supratentorial abnormalities were found in 4 cases. All but 2 patients were born at term. We confirm the distinct neuroimaging pattern of cerebellar clefts. Considering the documented fetal cerebellar hemorrhage in our first series, we postulate that cerebellar clefts usually represent residual disruptive changes after a prenatal cerebellar hemorrhage. Exceptionally, as now documented in 2 patients, cerebellar clefts can be found after neonatal cerebellar hemorrhages in preterm infants. The short-term outcome in these children was variable.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:12 Jul 2010 15:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:10
Publisher:Thieme
ISSN:0174-304X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0030-1248265
PubMed ID:20221959

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