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Processing of angular motion and gravity information through an internal model


Laurens, J; Straumann, D; Hess, B J M (2010). Processing of angular motion and gravity information through an internal model. Journal of Neurophysiology, 104(3):1370-1381.

Abstract

The vestibular organs in the base of the skull provide important information about head orientation and motion in space. Previous studies have suggested that both angular velocity information from the semicircular canals and information about head orientation and translation from the otolith organs are centrally processed in an internal model of head motion, using the principles of optimal estimation. This concept has been successfully applied to model behavioral responses to classical vestibular motion paradigms. In this study measured the dynamic of the vestibulo-ocular reflex during post-rotatory tilt, tilt during the optokinetic afternystagmus and off-vertical axis rotation. The influence of otolith signal on the VOR was systematically varied by using a series of tilt angles. We found that the time constants of responses varied almost identically as a function of gravity in these paradigms. We show that Bayesian modeling could predict the experimental results in an accurate and consistent manner. In contrast to other approaches, the Bayesian model also provides a plausible explanation of why these vestibulo-oculomotor responses occur as a consequence of an internal process of optimal motion estimation.

Abstract

The vestibular organs in the base of the skull provide important information about head orientation and motion in space. Previous studies have suggested that both angular velocity information from the semicircular canals and information about head orientation and translation from the otolith organs are centrally processed in an internal model of head motion, using the principles of optimal estimation. This concept has been successfully applied to model behavioral responses to classical vestibular motion paradigms. In this study measured the dynamic of the vestibulo-ocular reflex during post-rotatory tilt, tilt during the optokinetic afternystagmus and off-vertical axis rotation. The influence of otolith signal on the VOR was systematically varied by using a series of tilt angles. We found that the time constants of responses varied almost identically as a function of gravity in these paradigms. We show that Bayesian modeling could predict the experimental results in an accurate and consistent manner. In contrast to other approaches, the Bayesian model also provides a plausible explanation of why these vestibulo-oculomotor responses occur as a consequence of an internal process of optimal motion estimation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2010
Deposited On:16 Jul 2010 15:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:12
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:0022-3077
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00143.2010
Official URL:http://jn.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/jn.00143.2010v1
PubMed ID:20610780

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