Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Treatment of inclusion body myositis: is low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin the solution?


Recher, M; Sahrbacher, U; Bremer, J; Arndt, B; Steiner, U; Fontana, A (2012). Treatment of inclusion body myositis: is low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin the solution? Rheumatology International, 32(2):469-472.

Abstract

Inclusion body myositis (IBM), the most common inflammatory myopathy in the elderly, is often resistant to various forms of therapy. Placebo-controlled treatment trials with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have shown disease amelioration in some but not all patients. Here, we present the informative case of a 70-year-old woman with diagnosed inclusion body myositis that showed progressive muscle weakness without treatment and following immuno-suppressive treatment with corticosteroids and azathioprine. A trial with low-dose intravenous immunoglobulins was started at that time. The patient responded rapidly to low dose IVIG treatment with amelioration of muscle strength and normalization of CK serum activities. Our results demonstrate that IBM patients may respond to low-dose IVIG treatment which has important clinical and economic consequences.

Abstract

Inclusion body myositis (IBM), the most common inflammatory myopathy in the elderly, is often resistant to various forms of therapy. Placebo-controlled treatment trials with high dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have shown disease amelioration in some but not all patients. Here, we present the informative case of a 70-year-old woman with diagnosed inclusion body myositis that showed progressive muscle weakness without treatment and following immuno-suppressive treatment with corticosteroids and azathioprine. A trial with low-dose intravenous immunoglobulins was started at that time. The patient responded rapidly to low dose IVIG treatment with amelioration of muscle strength and normalization of CK serum activities. Our results demonstrate that IBM patients may respond to low-dose IVIG treatment which has important clinical and economic consequences.

Statistics

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 05 Nov 2010
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Immunology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Nov 2010 10:07
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 09:19
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0172-8172
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00296-009-1290-z
PubMed ID:20044785

Download