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Reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity of monocyte interleukin-6 production in male industrial employees who are vitally exhausted.


Wirtz, P H; von Känel, R; Schnorpfeil, P; Ehlert, Ulrike; Frey, K; Fischer, J E (2003). Reduced glucocorticoid sensitivity of monocyte interleukin-6 production in male industrial employees who are vitally exhausted. Psychosomatic Medicine, 65(4):672-8.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Proinflammatory changes are thought to link vital exhaustion with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Monocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions and are a major source of circulating cytokines. We hypothesized that vital exhaustion may alter the regulation of monocyte activity, as measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated and glucocorticoid inhibited release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). METHODS: In 166 middle-aged apparently healthy men, vital exhaustion was measured by the Shortened Maastricht Exhaustion Questionnaire. Subjects in the highest quartile (highly exhausted, N= 38) were compared with those in the second and third quartiles (moderately exhausted N= 89) vs. those in the lowest quartile (nonexhausted, N= 39) in terms of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels, and as to IL-6 release after LPS stimulation in vitro. Inhibition of IL-6 release was determined by coincubation with increasing concentrations of dexamethasone. Monocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity was defined as the dexamethasone concentration inhibiting IL-6 release by 50%. RESULTS: Highly exhausted individuals had higher CRP levels than nonexhausted subjects (p=.008). LPS-stimulated IL-6 release was not significantly different between groups. However, in highly exhausted participants, dexamethasone was less able to inhibit IL-6 release (p=.010), and the glucocorticoid sensitivity was lower (p=.003) than in nonexhausted subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In highly exhausted individuals, glucocorticoids exert less suppressive action on monocyte IL-6 release than in nonexhausted subjects. This finding points to altered regulation of monocyte cytokine production as one possible pathway linking exhaustion with atherosclerosis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Proinflammatory changes are thought to link vital exhaustion with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Monocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions and are a major source of circulating cytokines. We hypothesized that vital exhaustion may alter the regulation of monocyte activity, as measured by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated and glucocorticoid inhibited release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). METHODS: In 166 middle-aged apparently healthy men, vital exhaustion was measured by the Shortened Maastricht Exhaustion Questionnaire. Subjects in the highest quartile (highly exhausted, N= 38) were compared with those in the second and third quartiles (moderately exhausted N= 89) vs. those in the lowest quartile (nonexhausted, N= 39) in terms of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels, and as to IL-6 release after LPS stimulation in vitro. Inhibition of IL-6 release was determined by coincubation with increasing concentrations of dexamethasone. Monocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity was defined as the dexamethasone concentration inhibiting IL-6 release by 50%. RESULTS: Highly exhausted individuals had higher CRP levels than nonexhausted subjects (p=.008). LPS-stimulated IL-6 release was not significantly different between groups. However, in highly exhausted participants, dexamethasone was less able to inhibit IL-6 release (p=.010), and the glucocorticoid sensitivity was lower (p=.003) than in nonexhausted subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In highly exhausted individuals, glucocorticoids exert less suppressive action on monocyte IL-6 release than in nonexhausted subjects. This finding points to altered regulation of monocyte cytokine production as one possible pathway linking exhaustion with atherosclerosis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2003
Deposited On:31 Aug 2010 07:47
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 03:14
Publisher:American Psychosomatic Society
ISSN:0033-3174
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/01.PSY.0000062529.39901.C7
PubMed ID:12883121

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