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Monocyte proinflammatory cytokine release is higher and glucocorticoid sensitivity is lower in middle aged men than in women independent of cardiovascular risk factors.


Wirtz, P H; von Känel, R; Rohleder, N; Fischer, J E (2004). Monocyte proinflammatory cytokine release is higher and glucocorticoid sensitivity is lower in middle aged men than in women independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Heart, 90(8):853-858.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether stimulated monocyte cytokine release and its inhibition by glucocorticoids differs between men and women. DESIGN: In vitro monocyte interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) release after lipopolysaccharide stimulation were assessed with and without co-incubation with increasing doses of dexamethasone and hydrocortisone separately. Glucocorticoid sensitivity was defined as the amount of a particular glucocorticoid required to inhibit lipopolysaccharide stimulated monocyte cytokine release by 50%. The established cardiovascular risk factors of age, body mass index, number of cigarettes smoked daily, low density cholesterol to high density cholesterol ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and haemoglobin A1c were used as covariates.
SETTING: Aircraft manufacturing plant in southern Germany.
PATIENTS: 269 middle aged male and 36 middle aged female employees.
RESULTS: Release of monocyte IL-6 and TNFalpha (each p = 0.001) was higher in samples from men than in those from women. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated IL-6 and TNFalpha release by either glucocorticoid was less pronounced in samples from men than in those from women (IL-6: dexamethasone p = 0.033, hydrocortisone p = 0.029;
TNFalpha: dexamethasone p < 0.001, hydrocortisone p = 0.089).
CONCLUSIONS: The finding suggests that proinflammatory activity of circulating monocytes is higher in men than in women independent of cardiovascular risk factors, thereby providing one explanation for the relatively greater coronary risk in men.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether stimulated monocyte cytokine release and its inhibition by glucocorticoids differs between men and women. DESIGN: In vitro monocyte interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) release after lipopolysaccharide stimulation were assessed with and without co-incubation with increasing doses of dexamethasone and hydrocortisone separately. Glucocorticoid sensitivity was defined as the amount of a particular glucocorticoid required to inhibit lipopolysaccharide stimulated monocyte cytokine release by 50%. The established cardiovascular risk factors of age, body mass index, number of cigarettes smoked daily, low density cholesterol to high density cholesterol ratio, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and haemoglobin A1c were used as covariates.
SETTING: Aircraft manufacturing plant in southern Germany.
PATIENTS: 269 middle aged male and 36 middle aged female employees.
RESULTS: Release of monocyte IL-6 and TNFalpha (each p = 0.001) was higher in samples from men than in those from women. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide stimulated IL-6 and TNFalpha release by either glucocorticoid was less pronounced in samples from men than in those from women (IL-6: dexamethasone p = 0.033, hydrocortisone p = 0.029;
TNFalpha: dexamethasone p < 0.001, hydrocortisone p = 0.089).
CONCLUSIONS: The finding suggests that proinflammatory activity of circulating monocytes is higher in men than in women independent of cardiovascular risk factors, thereby providing one explanation for the relatively greater coronary risk in men.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2004
Deposited On:31 Aug 2010 07:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:1355-6037
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2002.003426
PubMed ID:15253951

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