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Procoagulant stress reactivity and recovery in apparently healthy men with systolic and diastolic hypertension.


Wirtz, P H; Ehlert, Ulrike; Emini, L; Rüdisüli, K; Groessbauer, S; von Känel, R (2007). Procoagulant stress reactivity and recovery in apparently healthy men with systolic and diastolic hypertension. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 63(1):51-8.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether systemic systolic hypertension (SHT) and diastolic hypertension (DHT) are associated with an exaggerated response of factor VII clotting activity (FVII:C), factor VIII clotting activity (FVIII:C), fibrinogen, and d-dimer to acute psychosocial stress. METHODS: We performed the 15-min Trier Social Stress Test (i.e., combination of task preparation, job interview and mental arithmetic) in a sample of 42 middle-aged apparently healthy and unmedicated men with normal and elevated blood pressure (BP) (i.e. screening systolic and/or diastolic BP>or=130/85 mmHg). Blood samples for coagulation measures were obtained immediately pre and post stress and 20 min and 60 min thereafter. Repeated measures analyses of covariance controlled for age, body mass index, screening mean arterial BP, and resting level of coagulation factors. RESULTS: There was a stress-by-DHT interaction for changes across all time points in FVII:C (P=.027), FVIII:C (P=.018), and d-dimer (P=.011) explaining between 14% and 17% of the variance. Compared to subjects without DHT, diastolic hypertensives had higher FVII:C immediately post stress (P=.085, Cohen's d=.60) and at 20-min recovery (P=.19, d=.46), higher FVIII:C at 20- (P=.028, d=.78) and at 60-min (P=.035, d=.75) recovery, and higher D-dimer at 20-min recovery (P=.10, d=.58). A significant stress-by-SHT interaction for fibrinogen (P=.050) became nonsignificant when controlling for covariates. CONCLUSION: Diastolic hypertension exaggerated the acute procoagulant response to stress in middle-aged men. This effect was particularly observed during recovery of hypercoagulability from stress. The findings suggest a psychobiological mechanism linking stress with an increased atherothrombotic risk in hypertensive individuals.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether systemic systolic hypertension (SHT) and diastolic hypertension (DHT) are associated with an exaggerated response of factor VII clotting activity (FVII:C), factor VIII clotting activity (FVIII:C), fibrinogen, and d-dimer to acute psychosocial stress. METHODS: We performed the 15-min Trier Social Stress Test (i.e., combination of task preparation, job interview and mental arithmetic) in a sample of 42 middle-aged apparently healthy and unmedicated men with normal and elevated blood pressure (BP) (i.e. screening systolic and/or diastolic BP>or=130/85 mmHg). Blood samples for coagulation measures were obtained immediately pre and post stress and 20 min and 60 min thereafter. Repeated measures analyses of covariance controlled for age, body mass index, screening mean arterial BP, and resting level of coagulation factors. RESULTS: There was a stress-by-DHT interaction for changes across all time points in FVII:C (P=.027), FVIII:C (P=.018), and d-dimer (P=.011) explaining between 14% and 17% of the variance. Compared to subjects without DHT, diastolic hypertensives had higher FVII:C immediately post stress (P=.085, Cohen's d=.60) and at 20-min recovery (P=.19, d=.46), higher FVIII:C at 20- (P=.028, d=.78) and at 60-min (P=.035, d=.75) recovery, and higher D-dimer at 20-min recovery (P=.10, d=.58). A significant stress-by-SHT interaction for fibrinogen (P=.050) became nonsignificant when controlling for covariates. CONCLUSION: Diastolic hypertension exaggerated the acute procoagulant response to stress in middle-aged men. This effect was particularly observed during recovery of hypercoagulability from stress. The findings suggest a psychobiological mechanism linking stress with an increased atherothrombotic risk in hypertensive individuals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2007
Deposited On:17 Sep 2010 11:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-3999
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2007.01.014
PubMed ID:17586337

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