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Temporal and spatial patterns of cortical activation during assisted lower limb movement


Wieser, M; Haefeli, Jenny; Bütler, L; Jäncke, Lutz; Riener, R; Koeneke, S (2010). Temporal and spatial patterns of cortical activation during assisted lower limb movement. Experimental Brain Research, 203(1):181-191.

Abstract

Human gait is a complex process in the central nervous system that results from the integrity of various mechanisms, including different cortical and subcortical structures. In the present study, we investigated cortical activity during lower limb movement using EEG. Assisted by a dynamic tilt table, all subjects performed standardized stepping movements in an upright position. Source localization of the movement-related potential in relation to spontaneous EEG showed activity in brain regions classically associated with human gait such as the primary motor cortex, the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor cortex, the cingulate cortex, the primary somatosensory cortex and the somatosensory association cortex. Further, we observed a task-related power decrease in the alpha and beta frequency band at electrodes overlying the leg motor area. A temporal activation and deactivation of the involved brain regions as well as the chronological sequence of the movement-related potential could be mapped to specific phases of the gait-like leg movement. We showed that most cortical capacity is needed for changing the direction between the flexion and extension phase. An enhanced understanding of the human gait will provide a basis to improve applications in the field of neurorehabilitation and brain-computer interfaces.

Abstract

Human gait is a complex process in the central nervous system that results from the integrity of various mechanisms, including different cortical and subcortical structures. In the present study, we investigated cortical activity during lower limb movement using EEG. Assisted by a dynamic tilt table, all subjects performed standardized stepping movements in an upright position. Source localization of the movement-related potential in relation to spontaneous EEG showed activity in brain regions classically associated with human gait such as the primary motor cortex, the premotor cortex, the supplementary motor cortex, the cingulate cortex, the primary somatosensory cortex and the somatosensory association cortex. Further, we observed a task-related power decrease in the alpha and beta frequency band at electrodes overlying the leg motor area. A temporal activation and deactivation of the involved brain regions as well as the chronological sequence of the movement-related potential could be mapped to specific phases of the gait-like leg movement. We showed that most cortical capacity is needed for changing the direction between the flexion and extension phase. An enhanced understanding of the human gait will provide a basis to improve applications in the field of neurorehabilitation and brain-computer interfaces.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2010
Deposited On:08 Oct 2010 12:23
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 14:56
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-010-2223-5
PubMed ID:20364340

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