Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Prevalence and morphology of coronary artery ectasia with dual-source CT coronary angiography


Leschka, S; Stolzmann, P; Scheffel, H; Wildermuth, S; Plass, A; Genoni, M; Marincek, B; Alkadhi, H (2008). Prevalence and morphology of coronary artery ectasia with dual-source CT coronary angiography. European Radiology, 18(12):2776-2784.

Abstract

To assess the prevalence and morphological characteristics of coronary artery ectasia (CAE) with CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in comparison to conventional catheterangiography (CCA). Dual-source CTCA examinations from 677 consecutive patients (223 women; median age 57 years) were retrospectively evaluated by two blinded observers for the presence of CAE defined as a diameter enlargement >/=1.5 times the diameter of adjacent normal coronary segments. Vessel diameters and contrast attenuation within and proximal to ectatic segments were measured. CCA was used to compare measurements obtained from CTCA with the coronary flow velocity by using the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. CTCA identified CAE in 20 of 677 (3%) patients. CCA was performed in ten of these patients. CAE diameter measurements with CTCA (10.0 +/- 5.4 mm) correlated significantly (r = 0.92, p < 0.001) with the CCA measurements (8.8 +/- 4.9 mm), but had higher diameters (levels of agreement: -1.0 to 3.4 mm). Contrast attenuation was significantly lower in the ectatic (343 +/- 63 HU) than in the proximal (394 +/- 60 HU) segments (p < 0.01). The attenuation difference significantly correlated with the CAE ratio (r = 0.67, p < 0.01) and the TIMI frame count (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). The prevalence of CAE in a population examined by CTCA is around 3%. Contrast attenuation measurements with CTCA correlate well with the flow alterations assessed with CCA.

Abstract

To assess the prevalence and morphological characteristics of coronary artery ectasia (CAE) with CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in comparison to conventional catheterangiography (CCA). Dual-source CTCA examinations from 677 consecutive patients (223 women; median age 57 years) were retrospectively evaluated by two blinded observers for the presence of CAE defined as a diameter enlargement >/=1.5 times the diameter of adjacent normal coronary segments. Vessel diameters and contrast attenuation within and proximal to ectatic segments were measured. CCA was used to compare measurements obtained from CTCA with the coronary flow velocity by using the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. CTCA identified CAE in 20 of 677 (3%) patients. CCA was performed in ten of these patients. CAE diameter measurements with CTCA (10.0 +/- 5.4 mm) correlated significantly (r = 0.92, p < 0.001) with the CCA measurements (8.8 +/- 4.9 mm), but had higher diameters (levels of agreement: -1.0 to 3.4 mm). Contrast attenuation was significantly lower in the ectatic (343 +/- 63 HU) than in the proximal (394 +/- 60 HU) segments (p < 0.01). The attenuation difference significantly correlated with the CAE ratio (r = 0.67, p < 0.01) and the TIMI frame count (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). The prevalence of CAE in a population examined by CTCA is around 3%. Contrast attenuation measurements with CTCA correlate well with the flow alterations assessed with CCA.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 29 Sep 2008
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:December 2008
Deposited On:29 Sep 2008 10:25
Last Modified:06 Dec 2017 14:19
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-008-1087-6
PubMed ID:18641995

Download