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Dual-energy CT with tin filter technology for the discrimination of renal lesion proxies containing blood, protein, and contrast-agent. An experimental phantom study


Karlo, C A; Lauber, A; Götti, R P l; Baumüller, S; Stolzmann, P; Scheffel, H; Desbiolles, L; Schmidt, B; Marincek, B; Alkadhi, H; Leschka, S (2011). Dual-energy CT with tin filter technology for the discrimination of renal lesion proxies containing blood, protein, and contrast-agent. An experimental phantom study. European Radiology, 21(2):385-392.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To differentiate proxy renal cystic lesions containing protein, blood, iodine contrast or saline solutions using dual-energy CT (DECT) equipped with a new tin filter technology (TFT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 70 proxies (saline, protein, blood and contrast agent) were placed in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced kidney phantoms. DECT was performed at 80/140 kV with and without tin filtering. Two readers measured the CT attenuation values in all proxies twice. An 80/140 kV ratio was calculated. RESULTS: All intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent (r = 0.93-0.97; p < 0.001). All CT attenuation values were significantly higher in the enhanced than in the unenhanced setting (p < 0.05; average increase, 12.5 +/- 3.6HU), while the ratios remained similar (each, p > 0.05). The CT attenuation of protein, blood and contrast agent solution differed significantly with tin filtering (p < 0.01-0.05). Significant differences were found between the ratios of protein and blood compared to contrast medium solution (each, p < 0.05) and between the ratios of protein and blood in both phantoms with tin filtering (each, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: DECT allows discrimination between a proxy renal lesion containing contrast agent and lesions containing protein and blood through their different attenuation at 80 kV and 140 kV. Further discrimination between protein and blood containing proxies is possible when using a tin filter.

Abstract

PURPOSE: To differentiate proxy renal cystic lesions containing protein, blood, iodine contrast or saline solutions using dual-energy CT (DECT) equipped with a new tin filter technology (TFT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 70 proxies (saline, protein, blood and contrast agent) were placed in unenhanced and contrast-enhanced kidney phantoms. DECT was performed at 80/140 kV with and without tin filtering. Two readers measured the CT attenuation values in all proxies twice. An 80/140 kV ratio was calculated. RESULTS: All intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent (r = 0.93-0.97; p < 0.001). All CT attenuation values were significantly higher in the enhanced than in the unenhanced setting (p < 0.05; average increase, 12.5 +/- 3.6HU), while the ratios remained similar (each, p > 0.05). The CT attenuation of protein, blood and contrast agent solution differed significantly with tin filtering (p < 0.01-0.05). Significant differences were found between the ratios of protein and blood compared to contrast medium solution (each, p < 0.05) and between the ratios of protein and blood in both phantoms with tin filtering (each, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: DECT allows discrimination between a proxy renal lesion containing contrast agent and lesions containing protein and blood through their different attenuation at 80 kV and 140 kV. Further discrimination between protein and blood containing proxies is possible when using a tin filter.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:15 Nov 2010 08:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
Additional Information:The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00330-010-1926-0
PubMed ID:20711733

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