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Effects of small pulsed nanocurrents on cell viability in vitro and in vivo: implications for biomedical electrodes


Gabi, M; Bullen, M E; Agarkova, I; Schmidt, D; Schoenauer, R; Brokopp, C E; Emmert, M Y; Larmagnac, A; Sannomiya, T; Weber, B; Wilhelm, M J; Vörös, J; Hoerstrup, S P (2010). Effects of small pulsed nanocurrents on cell viability in vitro and in vivo: implications for biomedical electrodes. Biomaterials, 31(33):8666-8673.

Abstract

Using a custom-built, implantable pulse generator, we studied the effects of small pulsed currents on the viability on rat aortic-derived cells (RAOC) in vitro. The pulsed currents (0.37A/m(2)) underwent apoptosis within 24h as shown by the positive staining for cleaved caspase-3 and classically apoptotic morphology. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of nanocurrents in vivo. The pulse generator was implanted subcutaneously in the rat model. The electrode|tissue interface histology revealed no difference between the active platinum surface and the neighboring control surface, however we found a large difference between electrodes that were functional during the entire experiment and non-active electrodes. These non-active electrodes showed an increase in impedance at higher frequencies 21 days post-implantation, whereas working electrodes retained their impedance value for the entire experiment. These results indicate that applied currents can reduce the impedance of implanted electrodes.

Abstract

Using a custom-built, implantable pulse generator, we studied the effects of small pulsed currents on the viability on rat aortic-derived cells (RAOC) in vitro. The pulsed currents (0.37A/m(2)) underwent apoptosis within 24h as shown by the positive staining for cleaved caspase-3 and classically apoptotic morphology. Based on these findings, we examined the effects of nanocurrents in vivo. The pulse generator was implanted subcutaneously in the rat model. The electrode|tissue interface histology revealed no difference between the active platinum surface and the neighboring control surface, however we found a large difference between electrodes that were functional during the entire experiment and non-active electrodes. These non-active electrodes showed an increase in impedance at higher frequencies 21 days post-implantation, whereas working electrodes retained their impedance value for the entire experiment. These results indicate that applied currents can reduce the impedance of implanted electrodes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:15 Nov 2010 12:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0142-9612
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.07.092
PubMed ID:20800892

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