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Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn's disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study


Bentz, S; Hausmann, M; Piberger, H; Kellermeier, S; Paul, S; Held, L; Falk, W; Obermeier, F; Fried, M; Schölmerich, J; Rogler, G (2010). Clinical relevance of IgG antibodies against food antigens in Crohn's disease: a double-blind cross-over diet intervention study. Digestion, 81(4):252-264.

Abstract

Background: Environmental factors are thought to play an important role in the development of Crohn’s disease (CD). Immune responses against auto-antigens or food antigens may be a reason for the perpetuation of inflammation. Methods: In a pilot study, 79 CD patients and 20 healthy controls were examined for food immunoglobulin G (IgG). Thereafter, the clinical relevance of these food IgG antibodies was assessed in a double-blind cross-over study with 40 patients. Based on the IgG antibodies, a nutritional intervention was planned. The interferon (IFN)γ secretion of T cells was measured. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was quantified in stool. Results: The pilot study resulted in a significant difference of IgG antibodies in serum between CD patients and healthy controls. In 84 and 83% of the patients, respectively, IgG antibodies against processed cheese and yeast were detected. The daily stool frequency significantly decreased by 11% during a specific diet compared with a sham diet. Abdominal pain reduced and general well-being improved. IFNγ secretion of T cells increased. No difference for eosinophil-derived neurotoxin in stool was detected. Conclusion: A nutritional intervention based on circulating IgG antibodies against food antigens showed effects with respect to stool frequency. The mechanisms by which IgG antibodies might contribute to disease activity remain to be elucidated.

Abstract

Background: Environmental factors are thought to play an important role in the development of Crohn’s disease (CD). Immune responses against auto-antigens or food antigens may be a reason for the perpetuation of inflammation. Methods: In a pilot study, 79 CD patients and 20 healthy controls were examined for food immunoglobulin G (IgG). Thereafter, the clinical relevance of these food IgG antibodies was assessed in a double-blind cross-over study with 40 patients. Based on the IgG antibodies, a nutritional intervention was planned. The interferon (IFN)γ secretion of T cells was measured. Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin was quantified in stool. Results: The pilot study resulted in a significant difference of IgG antibodies in serum between CD patients and healthy controls. In 84 and 83% of the patients, respectively, IgG antibodies against processed cheese and yeast were detected. The daily stool frequency significantly decreased by 11% during a specific diet compared with a sham diet. Abdominal pain reduced and general well-being improved. IFNγ secretion of T cells increased. No difference for eosinophil-derived neurotoxin in stool was detected. Conclusion: A nutritional intervention based on circulating IgG antibodies against food antigens showed effects with respect to stool frequency. The mechanisms by which IgG antibodies might contribute to disease activity remain to be elucidated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:13 Dec 2010 15:35
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 03:36
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0012-2823
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000264649
PubMed ID:20130407

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