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Rumen physiology constrains diet niche: linking digestive physiology and food selection across wild ruminant species


Codron, Daryl; Clauss, Marcus (2010). Rumen physiology constrains diet niche: linking digestive physiology and food selection across wild ruminant species. Canadian Journal of Zoology, 88(11):1129-1138.

Abstract

We propose a hypothesis for digestive constraints on the browsing and grazing options available to ruminants: that the diet-niche range (maximum and minimum grass intake) of a species is dependent upon its predisposition to stratified rumen contents, based on observations that this characteristic is a critical step towards enhanced fibre digestion and greater fluid throughput. We compare a physiological (heterogeneity of ingesta fluid content) and an anatomical (the intraruminal papillation pattern) measure with dietary evidence for a range of African and temperate species. Both measures are strongly related to the mean percentage of grass in species’ natural diets, as well as to the maximum and minimum levels of grass intake, respectively. The nature of these effects implies a stratification-level threshold, below which a species will not use a grass-based diet, but above which grass consumption can increase exponentially. However, above this threshold, a minimum percentage of grass in the diet is a prerequisite for optimal performance. We argue that this second constraint is crucial, as it depicts how a greater fluid throughput reduces potential for detoxification of plant secondary compounds, and therefore limits the maximum amount of browse a stratifying species will consume.

Abstract

We propose a hypothesis for digestive constraints on the browsing and grazing options available to ruminants: that the diet-niche range (maximum and minimum grass intake) of a species is dependent upon its predisposition to stratified rumen contents, based on observations that this characteristic is a critical step towards enhanced fibre digestion and greater fluid throughput. We compare a physiological (heterogeneity of ingesta fluid content) and an anatomical (the intraruminal papillation pattern) measure with dietary evidence for a range of African and temperate species. Both measures are strongly related to the mean percentage of grass in species’ natural diets, as well as to the maximum and minimum levels of grass intake, respectively. The nature of these effects implies a stratification-level threshold, below which a species will not use a grass-based diet, but above which grass consumption can increase exponentially. However, above this threshold, a minimum percentage of grass in the diet is a prerequisite for optimal performance. We argue that this second constraint is crucial, as it depicts how a greater fluid throughput reduces potential for detoxification of plant secondary compounds, and therefore limits the maximum amount of browse a stratifying species will consume.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:22 Dec 2010 08:47
Last Modified:11 May 2018 12:00
Publisher:National Research Council Canada
ISSN:0008-4301
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1139/Z10-077

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