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Social learning research outside the laboratory: How and why?


Kendal, R L; Galef, B G; van Schaik, C P (2010). Social learning research outside the laboratory: How and why? Learning & Behavior, 38(3):187-194.

Abstract

Social learning enables both human and nonhuman animals
to acquire information relevant to many biologically
important activities: foraging (Galef & Giraldeau, 2001;
Mesoudi & O’Brien, 2008), mate choice (Jones, De-
Bruine, Little, Burriss, & Feinberg, 2007; Laland, 1994;
White, 2004), conflict (Peake & McGregor, 2004), and
predator avoidance (Griffin, 2004). Although use of social
information is not inherently adaptive (Boyd & Richerson,
1985; Laland, 2004), its frequent roles in the development
in animals of both innovations (sensu Reader & Laland,
2003) and routine skills (Jaeggi et al., 2010; Krakauer,
2005), as well as its exceptional prevalence in human societies, suggest the importance of social information in
biological and cultural evolution.

Abstract

Social learning enables both human and nonhuman animals
to acquire information relevant to many biologically
important activities: foraging (Galef & Giraldeau, 2001;
Mesoudi & O’Brien, 2008), mate choice (Jones, De-
Bruine, Little, Burriss, & Feinberg, 2007; Laland, 1994;
White, 2004), conflict (Peake & McGregor, 2004), and
predator avoidance (Griffin, 2004). Although use of social
information is not inherently adaptive (Boyd & Richerson,
1985; Laland, 2004), its frequent roles in the development
in animals of both innovations (sensu Reader & Laland,
2003) and routine skills (Jaeggi et al., 2010; Krakauer,
2005), as well as its exceptional prevalence in human societies, suggest the importance of social information in
biological and cultural evolution.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:24 Jan 2011 09:38
Last Modified:08 Aug 2017 01:26
Publisher:The Psychonomic Society, Inc.
ISSN:1543-4494
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3758/LB.38.3.187

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