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Developmental changes in brain connectivity assessed using the sleep EEG


Tarokh, L; Carskadon, M A; Achermann, P (2010). Developmental changes in brain connectivity assessed using the sleep EEG. Neuroscience, 171(2):622-634.

Abstract

Adolescence represents a time of significant cortical restructuring. Current theories posit that during this period connections between frequently utilized neural networks are strengthened while underutilized synaptic connections are discarded. The aim of the present study was to examine the developmental evolution of connectivity between brain regions using the sleep EEG. All-night sleep EEG recordings in two longitudinal cohorts (children and teens) followed at 1.5-3 year intervals and one cross-sectional cohort (adults) were analyzed. The children and teen cohorts were 9/10 and 15/16 years at the initial assessment; ages of the adults were 20 to 23 years. Intrahemispheric, interhemispheric, and diagonal coherence was measured between all six possible pairings of two central (C3/A2 and C4/A1) and two occipital (O2/A1 and O1/A2) derivations during slow wave, stage 2, and, REM sleep. Within-subjects analyses were performed for the children and teen cohorts, and a linear regression analysis was performed across every assessment of all cohorts. Within-subject analyses revealed a maturational increase in coherence for both age cohorts, though the frequencies, sleep states, and regions differed between cohorts. Regression analysis across all age cohorts showed an overall linear increase in left and right intrahemispheric coherence for all sleep states across frequencies. Furthermore, coherence between diagonal electrode pairs also increased in a linear manner for stage 2 and REM sleep. No age-related trend was found in interhemispheric coherence. Our results indicate that sleep EEG coherence increases with age and that these increases are confined to specific brain regions. This analysis highlights the utility of the sleep EEG to measure developmental changes in brain maturation.

Abstract

Adolescence represents a time of significant cortical restructuring. Current theories posit that during this period connections between frequently utilized neural networks are strengthened while underutilized synaptic connections are discarded. The aim of the present study was to examine the developmental evolution of connectivity between brain regions using the sleep EEG. All-night sleep EEG recordings in two longitudinal cohorts (children and teens) followed at 1.5-3 year intervals and one cross-sectional cohort (adults) were analyzed. The children and teen cohorts were 9/10 and 15/16 years at the initial assessment; ages of the adults were 20 to 23 years. Intrahemispheric, interhemispheric, and diagonal coherence was measured between all six possible pairings of two central (C3/A2 and C4/A1) and two occipital (O2/A1 and O1/A2) derivations during slow wave, stage 2, and, REM sleep. Within-subjects analyses were performed for the children and teen cohorts, and a linear regression analysis was performed across every assessment of all cohorts. Within-subject analyses revealed a maturational increase in coherence for both age cohorts, though the frequencies, sleep states, and regions differed between cohorts. Regression analysis across all age cohorts showed an overall linear increase in left and right intrahemispheric coherence for all sleep states across frequencies. Furthermore, coherence between diagonal electrode pairs also increased in a linear manner for stage 2 and REM sleep. No age-related trend was found in interhemispheric coherence. Our results indicate that sleep EEG coherence increases with age and that these increases are confined to specific brain regions. This analysis highlights the utility of the sleep EEG to measure developmental changes in brain maturation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:10 Jan 2011 08:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:26
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0306-4522
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2010.08.071
PubMed ID:20833232

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