Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Risk of colorectal cancer in men on long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer


Gillessen, S; Templeton, A; Marra, G; Kuo, Y F; Valtorta, E; Shahinian, V B (2010). Risk of colorectal cancer in men on long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 102(23):1760-1770.

Abstract

Background Androgen deprivation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or orchiectomy is a common but controversial treatment for prostate cancer. Uncertainties remain about its use, particularly with increasing recognition of serious side effects. In animal studies, androgens protect against colonic carcinogenesis, suggesting that androgen deprivation may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Methods We identified 107 859 men in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993 through 2002, with follow-up available through 2004. The primary outcome was development of colorectal cancer, determined from SEER files on second primary cancers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the influence of androgen deprivation on the outcome, adjusted for patient and prostate cancer characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Men who had orchiectomies had the highest unadjusted incidence rate of colorectal cancer (6.3 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3 to 7.5), followed by men who had GnRH agonist therapy (4.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI = 4.0 to 4.9), and men who had no androgen deprivation (3.7 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI = 3.5 to 3.9). After adjustment for patient and prostate cancer characteristics, there was a statistically significant dose-response effect (P(trend) = .010) with an increasing risk of colorectal cancer associated with increasing duration of androgen deprivation. Compared with the absence of these treatments, there was an increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with use of GnRH agonist therapy for 25 months or longer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.53) or with orchiectomy (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.66). Conclusion Long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

Abstract

Background Androgen deprivation with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or orchiectomy is a common but controversial treatment for prostate cancer. Uncertainties remain about its use, particularly with increasing recognition of serious side effects. In animal studies, androgens protect against colonic carcinogenesis, suggesting that androgen deprivation may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Methods We identified 107 859 men in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database who were diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1993 through 2002, with follow-up available through 2004. The primary outcome was development of colorectal cancer, determined from SEER files on second primary cancers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the influence of androgen deprivation on the outcome, adjusted for patient and prostate cancer characteristics. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Men who had orchiectomies had the highest unadjusted incidence rate of colorectal cancer (6.3 per 1000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.3 to 7.5), followed by men who had GnRH agonist therapy (4.4 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI = 4.0 to 4.9), and men who had no androgen deprivation (3.7 per 1000 person-years; 95% CI = 3.5 to 3.9). After adjustment for patient and prostate cancer characteristics, there was a statistically significant dose-response effect (P(trend) = .010) with an increasing risk of colorectal cancer associated with increasing duration of androgen deprivation. Compared with the absence of these treatments, there was an increased risk of colorectal cancer associated with use of GnRH agonist therapy for 25 months or longer (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.53) or with orchiectomy (HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.66). Conclusion Long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

Statistics

Citations

33 citations in Web of Science®
33 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

212 downloads since deposited on 10 Jan 2011
21 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:10 Jan 2011 16:42
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 04:36
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0027-8874
Additional Information:This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Cardiovascular Research following peer review.
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djq419
PubMed ID:21068432

Download

Download PDF  'Risk of colorectal cancer in men on long-term androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer'.
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 284kB
View at publisher