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Satisfied and dissatisfied couples: Positive and negative dimensions, conflict styles, and relationships with family of origin


Bertoni, A; Bodenmann, Guy (2010). Satisfied and dissatisfied couples: Positive and negative dimensions, conflict styles, and relationships with family of origin. European Psychologist, 15(3):175-184.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to analyse marital functioning of satisfied couples and dissatisfied couples by comparing satisfied couples, dissatisfied couples, and couples in therapy. The sample was composed of totally 226 married couples (85 satisfied couples, 55 dissatisfied couples, 86 couples in therapy). Measures addressed topics such as positive and negative dimensions of marital functioning, conflict styles (compromise, violence, avoidance and offence) and the quality of the relationship with family of origin.
Results indicated that in comparison to distressed couples, nondistressed couples have more positive and less negative dimensions, a higher ratio between positivity and negativity, more appropriate conflict styles (more compromise and less violence, avoidance and offence) as well as a better relationship with their family of origin. Satisfied couples significantly showed the highest levels of positive dimensions, while couples in therapy reported the highest levels of negative dimensions. Dissatisfied couples were in-between.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to analyse marital functioning of satisfied couples and dissatisfied couples by comparing satisfied couples, dissatisfied couples, and couples in therapy. The sample was composed of totally 226 married couples (85 satisfied couples, 55 dissatisfied couples, 86 couples in therapy). Measures addressed topics such as positive and negative dimensions of marital functioning, conflict styles (compromise, violence, avoidance and offence) and the quality of the relationship with family of origin.
Results indicated that in comparison to distressed couples, nondistressed couples have more positive and less negative dimensions, a higher ratio between positivity and negativity, more appropriate conflict styles (more compromise and less violence, avoidance and offence) as well as a better relationship with their family of origin. Satisfied couples significantly showed the highest levels of positive dimensions, while couples in therapy reported the highest levels of negative dimensions. Dissatisfied couples were in-between.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:12 Oct 2011 16:22
Last Modified:22 Nov 2017 03:33
Publisher:Hogrefe & Huber Publishers
ISSN:1016-9040
Additional Information:This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in European Psychologist. It is not the version of record and is therefore not suitable for citation.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1027/1016-9040/a000015

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