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Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells lead to bone differentiation when cocultured with dental pulp stem cells


De Rosa, A; Tirino, V; Paino, F; Tartaglione, A; Mitsiadis, T A; Feki, A; d'Aquino, R; Laino, L; Colacurci, N; Papaccio, G (2011). Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells lead to bone differentiation when cocultured with dental pulp stem cells. Tissue Engineering. Part A, 17(5-6):645-653.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells are present in many tissues of the human body, including amniotic fluid (AF) and dental pulp (DP). Stem cells of both AF and DP give rise to a variety of differentiated cells. In our experience, DP stem cells (DPSCs) display a high capacity to produce bone. Therefore, our aim was to investigate if AF-derived stem cells (AFSCs) were able to undergo bone differentiation in the presence of DPSCs. AFSCs were seeded under three different conditions: (i) cocultured with DPSCs previously differentiated into osteoblasts; (ii) cultured in the conditioned medium of osteoblast-differentiated DPSCs; (iii) cultured in the osteogenic medium supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Results showed that AFSCs were positive for mesenchymal markers, and expressed high levels of Tra1-60, Tra1-80, BMPR1, BMPR2, and BMP-2. In contrast, AFSCs were negative for epithelial and hematopoietic/endothelial markers. When AFSCs were cocultured with DPSCs-derived osteoblasts, they differentiated into osteoblasts. A similar effect was observed when AFSCs were cultured in the presence of a conditioned medium originated from DPSCs. We found that osteoblasts derived from DPSCs released large amounts of BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor into the culture medium and that those morphogens significantly upregulate RUNX-2 gene, stimulating osteogenesis. This study highlights the mechanisms of osteogenesis and strongly suggests that the combination of AFSCs with DPSCs may provide a rich source of soluble proteins useful for bone engineering purposes.

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells are present in many tissues of the human body, including amniotic fluid (AF) and dental pulp (DP). Stem cells of both AF and DP give rise to a variety of differentiated cells. In our experience, DP stem cells (DPSCs) display a high capacity to produce bone. Therefore, our aim was to investigate if AF-derived stem cells (AFSCs) were able to undergo bone differentiation in the presence of DPSCs. AFSCs were seeded under three different conditions: (i) cocultured with DPSCs previously differentiated into osteoblasts; (ii) cultured in the conditioned medium of osteoblast-differentiated DPSCs; (iii) cultured in the osteogenic medium supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). Results showed that AFSCs were positive for mesenchymal markers, and expressed high levels of Tra1-60, Tra1-80, BMPR1, BMPR2, and BMP-2. In contrast, AFSCs were negative for epithelial and hematopoietic/endothelial markers. When AFSCs were cocultured with DPSCs-derived osteoblasts, they differentiated into osteoblasts. A similar effect was observed when AFSCs were cultured in the presence of a conditioned medium originated from DPSCs. We found that osteoblasts derived from DPSCs released large amounts of BMP-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor into the culture medium and that those morphogens significantly upregulate RUNX-2 gene, stimulating osteogenesis. This study highlights the mechanisms of osteogenesis and strongly suggests that the combination of AFSCs with DPSCs may provide a rich source of soluble proteins useful for bone engineering purposes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:05 Jan 2011 11:07
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:27
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1937-3341
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2010.0340
PubMed ID:20919950

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