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Effect of sedation and analgesia on postoperative amplitude-integrated EEG in newborn cardiac patients


Bernet, V; Latal, B; Natalucci, G; Doell, C; Ziegler, A; Wohlrab, G (2010). Effect of sedation and analgesia on postoperative amplitude-integrated EEG in newborn cardiac patients. Pediatric Research, 67(6):650-655.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to describe the effect of sedation and analgesia on postoperative amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) in newborns with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing heart surgery. This is a consecutive series of 26 newborns with CHD of which 16 patients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery and 10 patients did not. aEEG was monitored for at least 12 h preoperatively and started within the first 6 h postoperatively for 48 h. Outcome was assessed at 1 year of age. All 26 patients showed a normal preoperative continuous cerebral activity with sleep-wake cycles (SWC). The postoperative duration to return to normal background activity with SWC was similar for both groups. Independent of group assignment, patients requiring midazolam had a significantly later onset of a normal SWC than those without midazolam (p=0.03). Three patients in the CPB group and two in the non-CPB group showed continuous low voltage or flat trace after administration of fentanyl. These changes did not correlate with neurodevelopmental outcome. Sedation with midazolam has a transient effect on the background activity, whereas fentanyl can induce a severe pathologic background pattern. The significance of these changes on outcome is not yet clear. Thus, more attention should be paid to these effects when interpreting aEEG in this population.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to describe the effect of sedation and analgesia on postoperative amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) in newborns with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing heart surgery. This is a consecutive series of 26 newborns with CHD of which 16 patients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery and 10 patients did not. aEEG was monitored for at least 12 h preoperatively and started within the first 6 h postoperatively for 48 h. Outcome was assessed at 1 year of age. All 26 patients showed a normal preoperative continuous cerebral activity with sleep-wake cycles (SWC). The postoperative duration to return to normal background activity with SWC was similar for both groups. Independent of group assignment, patients requiring midazolam had a significantly later onset of a normal SWC than those without midazolam (p=0.03). Three patients in the CPB group and two in the non-CPB group showed continuous low voltage or flat trace after administration of fentanyl. These changes did not correlate with neurodevelopmental outcome. Sedation with midazolam has a transient effect on the background activity, whereas fentanyl can induce a severe pathologic background pattern. The significance of these changes on outcome is not yet clear. Thus, more attention should be paid to these effects when interpreting aEEG in this population.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:21 Jan 2011 13:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:31
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0031-3998
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1203/PDR.0b013e3181da44ba
PubMed ID:20496474

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