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Successful control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak at a university department of dermatology


Gilomen, S; Ruef, C; Held, L; Cathomas, A; French, L E; Hafner, J (2011). Successful control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreak at a university department of dermatology. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 25(4):441-446.

Abstract

Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the leading strains among multiresistant hospital microflora. In 2003, we noted an increase in the number of MRSA strain 35 among patients at the University of Zurich, Department of Dermatology. At the end of 2003, we implemented additional policies in hospital hygiene, which significantly decreased the number of MRSA infections. Methods This is a retrospective study on 65 consecutive patients at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Zurich, in whom MRSA contamination was newly diagnosed during the period of 2003-2008. All isolated strains were genotyped. We implemented additional policies as strict hand hygiene and avoidance of sharing the same ointment pots or tubes amongst patients. As soon as the skin disease was healed, decolonization of MRSA was undertaken by a 5-day topical treatment. Results Of the 65 MRSA patients, 19 (29%) patients carried a genotypical strain (MRSA 35) that was identified to be specific for the Department of Dermatology. Three health care workers (HCWs) were tested positive. The outlined measures reduced the incidence of new transmissions of this specific strain MRSA 35 significantly (P = 0.001) with a complete disappearance of new transmissions of MRSA 35 in the year 2008. Of the 65 patients, 15 (23%) patients became long-term carriers, among all (15/15; 100%) had persisting active skin lesions. Conclusions Strict hand hygiene and avoidance of sharing ointments among patients were highly effective measures in controlling an outbreak of MRSA. Complete of near-to-complete remission of the underlying dermatoses, skin lesions or chronic wounds, is a prerequisite for complete decolonization of MRSA carriers.

Abstract

Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the leading strains among multiresistant hospital microflora. In 2003, we noted an increase in the number of MRSA strain 35 among patients at the University of Zurich, Department of Dermatology. At the end of 2003, we implemented additional policies in hospital hygiene, which significantly decreased the number of MRSA infections. Methods This is a retrospective study on 65 consecutive patients at the Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Zurich, in whom MRSA contamination was newly diagnosed during the period of 2003-2008. All isolated strains were genotyped. We implemented additional policies as strict hand hygiene and avoidance of sharing the same ointment pots or tubes amongst patients. As soon as the skin disease was healed, decolonization of MRSA was undertaken by a 5-day topical treatment. Results Of the 65 MRSA patients, 19 (29%) patients carried a genotypical strain (MRSA 35) that was identified to be specific for the Department of Dermatology. Three health care workers (HCWs) were tested positive. The outlined measures reduced the incidence of new transmissions of this specific strain MRSA 35 significantly (P = 0.001) with a complete disappearance of new transmissions of MRSA 35 in the year 2008. Of the 65 patients, 15 (23%) patients became long-term carriers, among all (15/15; 100%) had persisting active skin lesions. Conclusions Strict hand hygiene and avoidance of sharing ointments among patients were highly effective measures in controlling an outbreak of MRSA. Complete of near-to-complete remission of the underlying dermatoses, skin lesions or chronic wounds, is a prerequisite for complete decolonization of MRSA carriers.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:09 Jan 2011 09:55
Last Modified:22 Nov 2017 18:19
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0926-9959
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-3083.2010.03810.x
PubMed ID:20659308

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