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Effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents


Granacher, U; Gollhofer, A; Kriemler, S (2010). Effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 81(3):245-251.

Abstract

Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents. Twenty high school students participated in this study and were assigned to either an intervention (n = 10) or control group (n = 10). The intervention group participated in a 4-week balance-training program integrated in their physical education lessons. Pre- and posttests included the measurements of postural sway on a balance platform, jumping height on a force platform, and maximal isometric leg extension force on a leg-press. Balance training resulted in significantly improved postural control, increased jumping height, and enhanced rate of force development of the leg extensors. Physiological adaptations rather than learning effects seem to be responsible for the observed findings. These results could have an impact on improving the performance level in various sports and on reducing the injury prevalence of the lower extremities.

Abstract

Deficits in strength of the lower extremities and postural control have been associated with a high risk of sustaining sport-related injuries. Such injuries often occur during physical education (PE) classes and mostly affect the lower extremities. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of balance training on postural sway, leg extensor strength, and jumping height in adolescents. Twenty high school students participated in this study and were assigned to either an intervention (n = 10) or control group (n = 10). The intervention group participated in a 4-week balance-training program integrated in their physical education lessons. Pre- and posttests included the measurements of postural sway on a balance platform, jumping height on a force platform, and maximal isometric leg extension force on a leg-press. Balance training resulted in significantly improved postural control, increased jumping height, and enhanced rate of force development of the leg extensors. Physiological adaptations rather than learning effects seem to be responsible for the observed findings. These results could have an impact on improving the performance level in various sports and on reducing the injury prevalence of the lower extremities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:12 Jan 2011 14:59
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 05:39
Publisher:American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance
ISSN:0270-1367
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.aahperd.org/rc/publications/rqes/upload/RQES_Sept2010_TOC.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.aahperd.org/rc/publications/rqes/Indexes.cfm (Publisher)
PubMed ID:20949844

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