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Changes in self-perceived role identity modulate pain perception


Kut, E; Schaffner, N; Wittwer, A; Candia, V; Brockmann, M; Storck, C; Folkers, G (2007). Changes in self-perceived role identity modulate pain perception. Pain, 131(1-2):191-201.

Abstract

Pain is an experience including physiological and psychological factors. We assume that emotions may be elicited and increased through self-perceived role identity and that change of role identity alters quality and intensity of pain perception. We used role-play strategies to assess whether pain can be better tolerated whenever, in an unavoidable and unpleasant context, role identity confers pain a meaningful and thus suitable character. We induced antithetic roles in 21 actors who received heat stimuli on their arms before and after role-play conditions. Pain tolerance, skin conductance and voice signals were measured. Pain tolerance increased for heroes/heroines and decreased for faint-hearts. Men showed higher pain tolerance. Heroes/heroines evaluated heat stimuli as more intense. Faint-hearts found pain stimuli more affectively loaded at lower temperatures. Women showed higher pain ratings. Hence, self-perception influences pain perception. Role-play strategies may be of value for new pain management strategies.

Abstract

Pain is an experience including physiological and psychological factors. We assume that emotions may be elicited and increased through self-perceived role identity and that change of role identity alters quality and intensity of pain perception. We used role-play strategies to assess whether pain can be better tolerated whenever, in an unavoidable and unpleasant context, role identity confers pain a meaningful and thus suitable character. We induced antithetic roles in 21 actors who received heat stimuli on their arms before and after role-play conditions. Pain tolerance, skin conductance and voice signals were measured. Pain tolerance increased for heroes/heroines and decreased for faint-hearts. Men showed higher pain tolerance. Heroes/heroines evaluated heat stimuli as more intense. Faint-hearts found pain stimuli more affectively loaded at lower temperatures. Women showed higher pain ratings. Hence, self-perception influences pain perception. Role-play strategies may be of value for new pain management strategies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:31 Mar 2009 09:28
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 13:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0304-3959
Additional Information:Elsevier - Full-text article
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pain.2007.04.012
Official URL:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6T0K-4NSV17V-3-F&_cdi=4865&_user=5294990&_orig=search&_coverDate=09%2F30%2F2007&_sk=998689998&view=c&wchp=dGLbVtz-zSkWb&md5=10b747bd0870f71f9a0e5aa1921850d6&ie=/sdarticle.pdf
PubMed ID:17521808

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