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Evidence for inbreeding depression and post-pollination selection against inbreeding in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia


Teixeira, S; Foerster, K; Bernasconi, G (2009). Evidence for inbreeding depression and post-pollination selection against inbreeding in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. Heredity, 102(2):101-112.

Abstract

In many species, inbred individuals have reduced fitness. In
plants with limited pollen and seed dispersal, post-pollination selection may reduce biparental inbreeding, but knowledge on the prevalence and importance of pollen competition or post-pollination selection after non-self pollination is scarce. We tested whether post-pollination selection favours less related pollen donors and reduces inbreeding in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. We crossed 20 plants with pollen from a sibling and an unrelated male, and with a mix of both. We found significant inbreeding depression on vegetative growth, age at first flowering and total fitness (22% in males and 14% in females). In mixed pollinations, the unrelated male sired on average 57% of the offspring. The greater the paternity share of the unrelated sire, the larger the difference in relatedness of the two males to the female.
The effect of genetic similarity on paternity is consistent with predictions for post-pollination selection, although paternity, at least in some crosses, may be affected by additional factors. Our data show that in plant systems with inbreeding depression, such as S. latifolia, pollen or embryo selection after multiple-donor pollination may indeed reduce inbreeding.

Abstract

In many species, inbred individuals have reduced fitness. In
plants with limited pollen and seed dispersal, post-pollination selection may reduce biparental inbreeding, but knowledge on the prevalence and importance of pollen competition or post-pollination selection after non-self pollination is scarce. We tested whether post-pollination selection favours less related pollen donors and reduces inbreeding in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia. We crossed 20 plants with pollen from a sibling and an unrelated male, and with a mix of both. We found significant inbreeding depression on vegetative growth, age at first flowering and total fitness (22% in males and 14% in females). In mixed pollinations, the unrelated male sired on average 57% of the offspring. The greater the paternity share of the unrelated sire, the larger the difference in relatedness of the two males to the female.
The effect of genetic similarity on paternity is consistent with predictions for post-pollination selection, although paternity, at least in some crosses, may be affected by additional factors. Our data show that in plant systems with inbreeding depression, such as S. latifolia, pollen or embryo selection after multiple-donor pollination may indeed reduce inbreeding.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:seed paternity; microsatellite DNA; sexual selection; pollen competition; inbreeding avoidance; relatedness
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:25 Feb 2011 16:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:36
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0018-067X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/hdy.2008.86
PubMed ID:18698334

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